Australia to act SMARTer with Global e-Sustainability

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Fujitsu and Telstra recently launched the SMARTer2030 Report: Australian Opportunity for ICT Enabled Emission Reductions. Based on the Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI) SMARTer2030 report, the study shows that ICT can support the Australian Government to surpass its carbon reduction target.

Lee Stewart, Head of Sustainability in the Oceania region, was interviewed by GeSI about the report, what opportunities it revealed and what the next steps for Australia are.

He revealed that Smart Agriculture technologies are well positioned to help farmers build efficiency and resilience against a changing climate, safeguarding Australia’s $53 billion a year agricultural sector, as well as saving precious water resources.  He also addressed how ICT can deliver economic and social benefits by improving equity of access in education and healthcare to Australians in rural and remote communities.  Lee highlights the fact that Australia can meet its carbon reduction targets by 2030 – just with fully deploying ICT that exists right now.

Lee identified three key factors in unlocking the potential of ICT to deliver economic, social and environmental benefits, on the GeSI blog.

Watch the Sky News Smart Money interview below, with Lee Stewart and Brad Freeman (VP, Business and Application Services) as they discuss the findings from the SMARTer2030 report.

Article by Blaise Porter – Fujitsu Sustainability Manager

 

 

Sustainability: The business imperative. Interview with Alison Rowe.

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Summary of article featured in I-CIO

In this interview, Alison Rowe, global executive director sustainability at Fujitsu, talks to I-CIO.com about the leadership approaches and technology investments required to make sustainability part of the corporate DNA.

Alison expresses her view that sustainability is integral to a business – not a separate element and that ICT has the capacity to “help build a safer, more prosperous and sustainable society, where knowledge is continually harnessed and people are empowered to innovate. We call this vision a Human Centric Intelligent Society.”

For global organisations, such as Fujitsu, Alison offers practical insight; “At Fujitsu, we have a global sustainability board that brings different parts of Fujitsu together to look at the business plan and understand the different market drivers across our geographies. That diversity of approach works providing there’s common alignment in what we’re doing, what it means, the language we’re using and how we report it.”

Read the complete article here.

Environmental benefits of desktop virtual computing

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The rise and uptake of the virtual desktop has enabled organisations to realise a number of benefits including improved user experience, better customer service and up to a 40% reduction in desktop support costs. Not to mention the ability for organisations to move from a CAPEX operating model to a more OPEX utility based platform.

Given the increases in services and solutions to date very little information has been made available about the sustainability and environmental benefit of a virtual desktop solution. With the rise in energy costs and environmental compliance the total environmental benefits of a virtual desktop solution have been to date undervalued.

Fujitsu has published a white paper that discusses the closely linked subjects of energy use and carbon emissions around the desktop environment. It looks at the potential decreased energy costs of deploying a virtual desktop solution based on Fujitsu Virtual Client Services (VCS), but also delves deeper into other tangible and intangible benefits such as more efficient maintenance, longer refresh cycles of desktop hardware, decreased heat load in buildings, ability to sweat assets longer and the potential reduced embodied carbon and emissions throughout the lifecycle of a virtual desktop. Continue reading

Fujitsu Rainforest Regeneration Project plants over 1,000 trees in Borneo Rainforest

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Our local Head of Sustainability, Lee Stewart, spent last week in the Borneo jungle planting over 1,000 trees as part of Fujitsu’s Rainforest Regeneration Project….
 
Last week I was fortunate to be one of five Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand staff who spent four days in the Borneo Jungle taking part in the Fujitsu Rainforest Regeneration Project.  Under testing conditions of 35+ degree heat with 70% humidity the team along with 50 other Fujitsu staff from over 8 different countries took part in numerous activities including measuring bio diversity, determining tree growth, maintenance and also planting seedlings.Rainforests are an extremely important part of our eco system they are responsible for around 40% of the world’s oxygen turnover. They are also nicknamed the world’s pharmacy as over a quarter of the world’s natural medicines have been discovered there. What is really amazing is that scientists still think that there may be millions of species of plants and insects that are yet to be discovered which may hold also the key to many medical cures.Lead by Fujitsu Japan the relationship with the local park in Borneo dates back over ten years and is a regular calendar event where Fujitsu staff work in collaboration with locals.  As a direct result of the work done by Fujitsu staff over the years the park now has over 39,000 new native trees.

How sustainable is ICT?

Fujitsu launched its third global benchmark report today into ICT sustainability maturity. This is a fantastic body of research that allows us to see how sustainability is progressing broadly within ICT departments, in different countries and in different industries.

The report tells us that there are challenges out there; overall Australia’s sustainability maturity is heading backwards. Why? That’s a good question and I’d be really interested to hear peoples thoughts on that. I think my top three would be:

  1. Hype is over: we had a lot of noise about “Green”. Everything and everyone was green for a while back there, even IT departments. Then we’ve learnt that it’s not quite as easy as first thought, projects need to be bedded in and maintained, they have to be part of a change program and can’t just be achieved as a tick in the box exercise.
  2.  ICT departments don’t align their strategy with the broader organisation sustainability strategy. So increased sustainability maturity is a by-product from projects and programs that they are looking to do anyway. This means we miss the opportunity to get maximum value from these projects.
  3. ICT departments are still not accountable for the power bill; while this year’s benchmark report shows that while this is improving, the majority of organisations don’t have visibility of their power bill and are not accountable for energy spend. The stats show that improvement in this metric is closely linked to better overall performance in other areas. So this one is key.

You can find the full report here

Challenges are, as we know, also opportunities. In a time of rising electricity costs, ICT departments can make a contribution to both the bottom line of the organisation as well as to its environmental performance. The Global Benchmark Report shows that many organisations today are achieving best practice and are already reaping the rewards.