Transition to enterprise mobility – a cultural change

Mobilizing1The focus of mobility and implementing an enterprise mobility solution tends to be on the technology itself. New devices, new apps, and ubiquitous secure access are all delivered through technology. However, the introduction of these technologies will fall well short of business expectations of improved productivity, collaboration and morale, without a parallel program of behavioural education and change management.

Fujitsu recognises that the delivery of IT capability must be fully integrated with a programme of business transformation if the target benefits and value are to be achieved. We work with clients to drive the change and can provide skills and advice to complement client’s own capabilities.

Our Transformation Framework
We think that the outcomes you should expect from a successful transformation are:

  • New ways of working have become “business as usual”.
  • Enhanced technology platform is an enabler of future business capabilities.
  • Your organisation recognises that the target benefits have been realised and that the contribution to your strategy and your future operating model have been achieved.
  • Your organisation now embraces change and further improvements are being actively sought.

We have strong underpinning capabilities in process improvement such as lean transformation, business change, organisation design and benefits realisation, as well as technology and applications. This is combined with deep functional expertise in HR, IT, procurement, customer experience and, finance and accounting.

For more information on Fujitsu Mobility go to: http://www.fujitsu.com/global/services/infrastructure/end-user-services/mobilize-workforce/

Citrix Announces Workplace Suite

Agile WorkingIn the age of mobility, businesses utilizing the Cloud can expect to become more agile, reducing the costs of provision and support of IT infrastructure, increasing productivity and fostering better collaboration – both in and out of the office.

While mobile innovation in the consumer sector is leading the way, enterprise IT is lagging behind, with each part of the business often driving specific solutions to meet their particular needs. However, organizations are now starting to recognize that an enterprise-wide approach to mobility is required if they are to maximize their return on investment.

In order to benefit from the mobile revolution, businesses need to evaluate the risks, wants and needs of their employees, whilst striking a balance between individual convenience and corporate control, addressing issues such as: collaboration, enterprise applications, automation, consumerization, and connectivity.

The announcement today by Citrix of the release of the Citrix Workspace Suite should give comfort to Enterprises contemplating a holistic, secure and integrated mobility solution. http://www.citrix.com/news/announcements/may-2014/workspace-suite-announcement.html

To quote Citrix “…this solution unites all content (apps, desktops, data, and services) for secure delivery to people in the way that best suits their working style.”

This is what a mobility solution is about – enabling individuals to be as productive as they can be by allowing them to work whenever, wherever, and on whatever device they need.

Powered by Citrix Workspace Suite, Fujitsu’s Mobility solutions delivers the right solution for the Enterprise. See here for more details on Fujitsu’s end user services and mobility solutions: http://www.fujitsu.com/global/services/infrastructure/end-user/

Digital Media improves the patient experience…

Healthcare

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Healthcare is an industry, in which technology can make a real difference to peoples’ lives. Our Digital Media team have put together an impressive demonstration of how innovative digital media solutions can be used to improve communication between patients and staff. Technologies such as Interactive Way Finders, Mobility, Bluetooth, Wi-Fi Hotspots and Augmented Reality can significantly improve the patient experience while allowing providers to make the best use of limited human and medical resources.

In line with Fujitsu’s Human Centric Vision, these technologies allow health providers to enhance the patient experience and reduce perceived waiting times in lobbies, waiting rooms, and other areas throughout the facilities. Our solutions are based on Fujitsu’s dynamic award winning TELentice™ Digital Media Solution software. Digital Media will transform the way you interact with your audience. Fujitsu provides an end-to-end digital media managed solution from hardware, software, integration, implementation, support, content management and network monitoring and reporting.

If you are interested in seeing these technologies in action, come and visit our Digital Media team at the very first Connect Expo in Melbourne on March 13th and 14th. We will be at Stand #75 and visitors will have a chance to win a brand new Fujitsu Slate Tablet Q572. To find out more information around Fujitsu’s Digital Media offering or to set up an alternative time to view this demonstration please visit us on http://au.fujitsu.com/digitalmedia or email us at digital.media@au.fujitsu.com

Do you really need the desktop?

30299_Lifestyle__Vertical__Architecture small

Charles Ponniah, Fujitsu’s lead architect for End User Services challenges the role of the desktop in the organisation…

With so much technology around us, there are plenty of questions for every CIO, IT Department and the end users themselves.

One major question that seems to be constantly asked is “Do you really need the desktop?”. The “desktop” here isn’t about the hardware workstation or PC that sits on or under your work desk. The “desktop” here is all about the familiar sight we all see once we’ve logged in past the “CTRL + ALT + DEL” screen and for some of us its that “cluttered” workspace with all our shortcuts, files, folders, music, pictures and anything we can get our hands on.

The “desktop” still has a part to play in the end user computing world and how we use our workstation today. Currently around 80% of applications require a desktop,  but in 2-3 years time this could reduce to as low as 30%.

This predicted massive percentage drop over the next 2-3 years has very much to do with the proliferation of the multitude of devices ranging from tablets, smartphones and “phablets (combining the feel of a tablet with the convenience of a smartphone).

The huge way in which end users make use of their smartphones and tablets at home is quickly being transferred to the workplace. End users expect the ability to work with these devices at work and the quickly changing technology landscape is fast becoming an enabler for these devices in the workplace.

The reason: people are using and want to use applications in their natural form, sized for things like the iPad with a smaller form factor, portability, responsive on touch screens, tablet ready and so on.

In today’s world the VDI word keeps getting repeated for the ability to deliver end user’s their workspace anywhere, anytime and from any device. But you’re still stuck with a desktop that appears hard to navigate on a small form factor device as mentioned above.

Enter the applications only workspace. Take away the desktop, the need to secure the desktop, the need to have shortcuts on your desktop or in your documents folder and the need to launch a start menu to launch applications.

Imagine a world where, you pick up your mobile tablet, scroll across your tablet screens and find an icon called Office Email, touch the icon to launch it and hey presto your working on your office email and happily responding to work emails, adding meetings, responding to meeting invites and so on. Then you look for an icon that says Office Browser, launch that and perform functions like approving time sheets, expenses and entering your timesheet for the day. The next thing is to launch an icon called Office Docs which then you proceed to launch a document called “Company Ideas – My review.docx”. You then type in your review, comments and corrections.

From the above, you’ve just done what you normally do by getting to a company office desktop but this time avoiding the need to go looking for the start menu or shorcuts to the programs, finding the shorcut you’ve created in a folder called “a million shortcuts” through launching Windows Explorer, to finding the shortcut to a word editing document and you do get the picture of how very quickly the “desktop” world will be replaced by the “apps” world. Continue reading

Towards the Agile Workplace

An interview with James Mercer, Solution Director for Virtual Client Services at Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand

What exactly do you mean by the term, ‘Agile Workplace’?

There are two aspects to agility in the workplace:

  • The agility of the workforce, and
  • The agility of the organisation in general

A truly agile workforce has the ability to access corporate systems and information from a variety of devices and locations. Access to corporate systems and data needs to be flexible enough to cater for employees varying work and life commitments. This typically means the ability to change devices and still be able to access corporate information at any time. We all find that the ideal device varies with what we are doing at the time. For example a mobile phone becomes our choice of device while travelling or between meetings. A tablet may be the choice at home, while the corporate PC or laptop is our chosen device when in the office. The key to agility in the workforce is to enable the same access regardless of the device that is being used at the time. 

An agile organisation needs to have the ability provide its workforce with the IT resources to meet its business needs at any point in time. This often means the ability to scale up and down in response to seasonal events. For example Christmas time is a big push for Retail organisations, while the end of the financial year is a big period for accountancy firms. An agile workplace must be able to scale ‘compute power’ up and down to meet the needs of users based on seasonal or unusual requirements. From a commercial point of view, consumption-based delivery models lend themselves better to this approach than traditional managed services models that rely on capacity to be forecast well in advance to accommodate all requirements – ultimately resulting in organisations paying for more capacity than they really need.

How are your customers embracing the concept? Do you see any patterns emerging?

We are seeing a lot of interest in Virtual Client Computing (which we brand Virtual Client Services (VCS)) – led by large enterprises. We are working with large organisations in transport, logistics, and financial services. We have had a lot of interest from all levels of government as well as support functions for government such as police forces. We are seeing this across Australia and New Zealand and I’m informed by my global counterparts that there is a significant demand worldwide.

The demand for VCS is definitely being led by large enterprises. It is clear that reducing costs is a major driver towards consumption-based services but there is also a clear requirement to be able to provide a more mobile experience for users.

There is a lot of talk about BYOD – does this approach have a place in the Agile Workplace and what challenges does this present for corporate IT departments?

 BYOD definitely plays a big part in the drive towards centralised computing, although many organisations are still struggling with the concept. What we will see is a change from managing devices to managing corporate applications and data. The technologies are becoming available to enable enterprises to manage applications and data regardless of the device. Currently there is still concern as corporates want to select and control devices but that mindset will change as the security around applications and data is improved through technologies such as the Citrix ‘Mobility Bundle’.

So do you think we are finally seeing the end of the PC in the corporate world?

We are still seeing good use cases particularly for people who work offline or who don’t have continuous access to communications infrastructure. People who travel a lot on trains or planes where the constant access to the network is not always guaranteed will still benefit from using a laptop. But for those who are always connected – whether it is by a telco data connection or Wi-Fi – remote desktops are fantastic. I can see that in a short time frame people will just go to work and log into a corporate device rather than carry their own laptop around. Alternatively PC’s and laptops may be replaced by lower cost devices such as Netbooks .When staff are away from the office users will be able to select the device or devices of their choice and access corporate systems securely – and all of these devices will have the ability to access to the same business applications and corporate data to allow the user to be productive. It will be less important to travel with a laptop and therefore promote more sustainable practices such as cycling or walking to work.

Of course there will always be a use case for people with specific needs to use a PC or laptop at work – for example high-end developers, and people who need access to bespoke systems, and legacy applications – so PCs will hang around for a while. But I think you will see a shift towards remote desktop computing with virtualised end-user services.

Is the Agile Workplace the domain of Gen Y? How will Baby Boomers adopt to this way of working?

Regardless of their generation, people will adopt a new approach to technology if they see value. The key for organisations to make the implementation of Virtual Client Services a success is to demonstrate to end users a superior service to the service they are currently using. Essentially we need to show people that there is no difference while they are in the office, but they have a much richer experience when they are out of the office. Our service provides a highly personalised, enterprise grade solution to ensure that users feel like they have been ‘upgraded’. Whereas traditionally people felt like they were being ‘downgraded’ by moving to a thin client.

What is the impact of Agile Working on corporate IT departments and what strategies do you recommend to make their lives easier?

In short, corporate IT are generally our biggest fans! A lot of headaches go away and it improves the agility of the organisation. It makes it easy for them to make changes and maintain policy. VCS has a significant impact on the corporate IT department and it is mainly all positive.

Firstly, computing is centralised so there is a much lower security risk than in a decentralised architecture. With a centralised approach it is also easier to encourage the use of best practices. For a large organisation it could mean the difference between having only a few hundred servers to manage as opposed to thousands  of Operating systems on PC’s- and most of the server images are copies of a Gold Build master – this makes managing VCS relatively simple to manage.

Software upgrades and adding new services is significantly easier. For example in the case of Microsoft Office instead of a gigabyte upgrade for each of several thousand PC’s the upgrade can be applied once and rolled out to the organisation almost immediately.

 

How to Select a Device for Enterprise Mobility

Over the last few years consumer devices have overtaken enterprise devices in a lot of ways. Many of the features originally developed for the enterprise are now leveraged in mobile phones that we all have. Does this mean it’s a no-brainer when it comes to choosing a device for an enterprise mobility project? Far from it, more choice brings more debate and more confusion. While BYOD may suit many organisations and mobile solutions it’s worth looking carefully at your own situation to determine which devices are appropriate.

Obviously amongst the fields of consumer and enterprise mobile devices there is a lot of variety and the technology is changing rapidly. What does stay more or less constant is that businesses want to get value for money. I’ll cover some of the key points to help you make up your own mind about what is right for your initiative. I’d suggest making a decision based on a good understanding of the current and future requirements. A good way to do this is by using a discovery, questionnaire, and/or workshop process. Try to ascertain what you can in the following areas:

Who are the mobile users?
When formulating a strategy for device selection I normally start with the user roles. For example:

  • Executives
  • Sales People
  • Customers
  • Subcontractors
  • Service Staff
  • IT personnel
  • Consumers
What will each user group do with the device?
You might find a 1:1 match between use cases and users but normally there is some cross over, so it’s important to understand what will be done with the devices. Here’s some examples:
  • Click through work flows
  • Create content or enter lots of text
  • Scan goods with a bar code or RFID
  • Capture a customer’s signature
  • View large documents
  • Take photographs of problems
  • Search on the Internet for information
  • Use mapping or Geo location services
 Where and when will they use the device?
Of course the environment may vary within a user group. This might be the time when you determine sub-groups with slightly different needs. Thinking about the following use profiles may help you determine battery life, or IP rating requirements.
  • In and around the city
  • In rural areas
  • Underground
  • In a vehicle or forklift
  • In wet areas, in the desert, in high temperatures
  • With chemicals or explosives
  • Occasional phone calls
  • All day data entry

What are the needs of the software?
You may have covered this stuff when evaluating the use cases, however its good to cross check and consider any technical requirements that you will have for the devices:

  • Particular operating system or version
  • Browser that supports HTML5
  • Anti Virus
  • Offline Database
  • Storage capacity
  • CPU type
  • Connectivity (Bluetooth, serial, usb)
  • Printing

OK that’s a lot of questions but once you have a handle on these areas you can map user groups, use cases, and form factors to help identify which device styles suit your business.  Often I do that in a spread-sheet format and if necessary you can apply weighting values to certain characteristics. So out of this work you should be able to determine the base requirements list for each device. Something like the following:

What are the device requirements?

  • Screen Size
  • Input Method
  • Peripherals
  • Battery Life
  • 4G/LTE/Wifi
  • Ruggedized or not

Let’s not forget the non-functional, procurement, and policy type requirements you may have in your organisation. For example: Continue reading