Agile management changes the business

Solidfire_291116

The 20th century model of business management had anything of consequence being decided at the top. Big leaders appoint little leaders, competition for power is constricting change, work is assigned and control is paramount.

The trouble with this 20th-century model is that it’s 20th-century – it has trouble competing with agile 21st-century businesses. The 21st-century business is a fast adapter and customer centricity is the driver for change and a disrupter for growth.

The older model has the company at the centre, with customers in orbit to be manipulated. In contrast, the modern, agile business model has the customer at the heart with the company in orbit, looking for ways to delight the customer.

In the latter kind of business, everyone in the organisation understands how their work contributes to the focus on the customer.

In agile management:

  •  Leaders see themselves and act as enablers rather than controllers
  •  Work is coordinated through structured, customer-focused practices, not bureaucracy
  •  Leaders model transparency and continuous improvement
  •  Communication is open and conversational, rather than top-down and hierarchical.

Manufacturing is in the early stage of adopting agile management. However, this trend will speed up as physical products become more software-driven and part of the Internet of Things – more and more devices and appliances becoming cyber-connected.

In other sectors, the debate is already over, with attention on improving agile methodologies, learning how to apply them across different teams, and reconciling team goals, practices and values with company goals, values and practices.

One of the United Kingdom’s leading hotel, restaurant and coffee shop operators, which boasts 45,000 employees, recently upgraded its IT systems to become more agile.

The new system gave it a flexible platform, enabling the company to be responsive and adaptable to its market and to other business demands. As a result, its business systems are more easily and widely available and suffer less downtime, and the company is more efficient and productive.

At the heart of this success is the efficient management of data – the traditional data centre just couldn’t cut it.

Next generation data centres are leading the way in enabling agile business management and SolidFire, an all-flash array, is empowering enterprises to adapt to massive IT changes. Even as little as two years ago, solid disk providers didn’t see an all-flash system like SolidFire as a threat, because of its cost. But prices have fallen and are still falling, and all-flash storage offers powerful advantages.

It keeps up with radical change because it can be expanded with no downtime and no need for reconfiguration and it offers faster access to data.

Let’s compare a traditional system with SolidFire:

Traditional System SolidFire
Single tenant Multi-tenant
Isolated workloads Mixed workloads
Dedicated infrastructure Shared infrastructure
Scale-up Scale-out
Manual administration Automation

Next generation data storage has to be at the heart of making your business agile. Download our infographic to see how SolidFire can help you.

 

What do Helsinki and Stockholm have in common with Melbourne?

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Helsinki

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Helsinki

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Stockholm
Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Stockholm

 

 

 

 

 

 

What DO they have in common?

They are all stops on this year’s Fujitsu World Tour.  With only two weeks to go before the Melbourne event, we would like to share with you some footage from the events held so far. The Fujitsu World Tour 2015 started in Helsinki, Finland and then moved on to Stockholm, Sweden.

As you can see from the videos, we are setting up for a feature-packed program including international thought leaders, innovative technology delivering one of the region’s most comprehensive technology exhibitions.

The theme of this year’s event is Human Centric Innovation, which focuses on how technology can impact the way we live and work in an increasingly hyperconnected world.

If you are in any way responsible for contributing to your organisation’s ICT strategy, this conference will provide some valuable insight into what to expect over the next few years.  Our international thought leaders will present their insights on topics such as The Internet of Things and also give you a glimpse into The Future of ICT.

So if you are interested in finding out how ICT will impact the way we live and work, register now as there are limited places available for this exciting event.

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 is coming to Melbourne!

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Fujitsu today announces the 2015 Fujitsu World Tour international roadshow under the theme ‘Human Centric Innovation’ is coming to Melbourne on Thursday 28 May. With 10,000 expected visitors in 19 locations, Fujitsu World Tour is one of the largest world-wide ICT roadshows where Fujitsu demonstrates how businesses can continue to find innovative ways to leverage ICT in a world where the way we live and work is continually changing.

Fujitsu has assembled an extensive line-up of international and regional speakers to deliver thought-provoking keynotes and strategic perspectives into technology innovation. The compelling and content-rich program will provide insight into some of the hottest topics in the industry. Dr Joseph Reger, Chief Technology Officer, Global Delivery will present a keynote about driving innovation in how we work and live; Dr Alex Bazin, Head of Market and Technology Services at Fujitsu will provide an insight into emerging technologies and the Internet of Things; and David Gentle, Fujitsu’s Director of Foresight and Planning will provide a glimpse of what we can expect in the future of ICT.

Other topics to be delivered by leading technology vendors including Symantec, Intel, Citrix, Microsoft and Rocket Software include ‘Strategies to control risk while driving growth’, ‘Reshaping Enterprise Mobility’, ‘Modernisation Made Easy’ and ‘Technologies to Transform Business IT’. Local and international customers will also share their experiences in implementing innovative solutions with best practice ICT.

As part of the World Tour, Fujitsu will host one of the region’s most comprehensive technology exhibitions, with a look into its latest innovations in research and development. There will also be numerous opportunities throughout the day to network with other ICT and business leaders.

Mike Foster, Chief Executive Officer of Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand, said: “As a result of the positive feedback we received from our customers and the industry from last year’s event in Sydney, we have secured our place on this year’s program. As it is part of a multi-city event, the World Tour is an excellent opportunity to share Fujitsu’s global thought leadership and innovation with our customers and partners in this region. This snapshot into the future is a powerful and exciting opportunity for ICT strategists to get ahead of the cycle.”

To find out more information about this event please visit the Fujitsu World Tour 2015 website.

 

 

The digital forces reshaping business and society

I-CIO_Erik2

In this video from www.I-CIO.com, MIT’s Erik Brynjolfsson discusses how the ‘second machine age’ will surpass the Industrial Revolution in its impact on our lives and economies – with digital technology as the catalyst.

He compares the first Industrial Revolution – when humans removed the limitations of physical muscles and we first harnessed the steam engine – to the second machine age where new digital technologies – including cloud, big data and artificial intelligence are driving growth at exponential growth.

If you are interested in receiving throught leadership and insights from I-CIO on a regular basis please contact us on info@au.fujitsu.com

Insights Quarterly – Focus on Applications and Security in Australia

 Applications and Security

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The latest edition of Insights Quarterly, a joint research initiative between Fujitsu and Microsoft, focuses on the much discussed topic of Application Security. The research, which is the result of surveying over 100 Australian CIOs confirms that security is no longer a second-level issue for CIOs – it is now well and truly top of mind. This concern is largely in the light of increased mobility.  Many organisations are having trouble addressing security issues and accommodating requirements such as support for Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) strategies.

Interestingly, despite strong concerns about all aspects of security, many user organisations are having difficulty addressing the issues. This is often because security only becomes a pressing concern once systems are compromised, and because many classes of security threats are comparatively new and there is a low level of awareness about how to deal with them.

Other findings of the report are that cloud computing is now considered ‘mainstream’, applications are migrating very quickly to mobile platforms and the cloud, and packaged software is becoming the norm.

The research is published on the Insights Quarterly Website: http://www.insightsquarterly.com.au, which contains the current and past reports as well as supporting research notes and PowerPoint presentations.

A perspective on technology trends for 2013

At Fujitsu, we believe passionately that innovation in technology is our route to secure a better future. We have an ambitious vision; we call it Human Centric Intelligent Society. Human Centric Intelligent Society is about building a better, more sustainable society through the power of ICT. It means putting people at the heart of the world, and using technology to deliver innovation into everything we do. It means powering business and society with information and bringing together the physical and digital to deliver greater benefit across society. And it means orchestrating technology from end to end to deliver greater understanding and control of the world around us.

In line with this vision we are pleased to announce our new Technology Perspectives website. Technology Perspectives is a collection of articles that represent the views and experience of key people from Fujitsu around the world including myself. We look at the many different ways in which technology is shaping our world in 2013 across a broad range of topics. We investigate the continually evolving relationship between the business world and technology, and the opportunities that will arise.

There is a wealth of information in this resource and I encourage you to read it and to use it as a reference for strategy and planning. We will spend some time on this blog during the year exploring some of the topics in more detail.

I would be very interested in hearing your feedback on this resource – please send any feedback to me via the comment form below.

Human-centric ICT and real-time Insight

Craig BatyCraig Baty our Chief Technology and Innovation Officer provides an insight into some of the lesser known benefits of Big Data strategies, and how Fujitsu is making this real for everyday people in the street….

Fujitsu’s overarching vision is based around the creation of a Human Centric Intelligent Society….the linkage of the “physical world”  and the “digital world”. The physical world is where we live – an environment now saturated with mobile devices and pervasive networks. That domain is backed by a digital world that holds vast resources of information and analytical power.

These two worlds are now being synchronized and exploited to provide previously unimaginable potential by delivering data-driven insight at high speeds, some impacts of this are:

  • Computing ecosystems are bringing new solutions that can be brought to bear on entire industries or across society.
  • Many different types of technology – mobile, network, cloud, sensors, social media and consumer electronics – are aligning into connected architectures to deliver richer and deeper content.
  • Decision-making time is being reduced or eliminated. The resulting analytical responses provide an increasingly clear perspective for greater assurance in decisions.

Big Data and implications of digital awareness of real life

When people think of ‘Big Data” they often think mostly about the processing of massive amounts of information with the aim of analysing this data to unearth nuggets of useful information. However this is only part of the Big Data definition.

“As a mega-trend, its impact will be as big as that of the Internet, the PC, or virtually any breakthrough technology you could name”

Fujitsu’s view is that Big Data is generally unstructured, comes from multiple sources (often from the Cloud), is generated and analysed in real time, and should be used not only to describe a situation, but to enable predictions to be made, and then actions to be  prescribed  based on the predictions. We call this Real Time Insight and it will have huge implications for us and how we live.

As a mega-trend, its impact will be as big as that of the Internet, the PC, or virtually any breakthrough technology you could name. In the near future we might anticipate that:

  • Systems will “sense and respond” rather than merely process transactions and the question “will humans or machines make the decision?” will arise with increasing frequency.
  • Our focus will have switched from reactive to proactive processes (medical treatment, for instance, will focus on maintaining wellbeing rather than on treating illness).
  • Speed of processing and decision making will be everything, and everything will be speeding up.

Big Data in action: Managing Tokyo’s traffic
Take for example the problem of managing Tokyo’s traffic. Tokyo is a huge metropolis with a very large population. Traffic jams and transport disruption is ubiquitous. Based on the concept of applying real-time insight, Fujitsu Japan has recently launched SpatioOwl – a cloud-based intelligent traffic management system. It collects data – masses of data – from an incredibly rich variety of sources. From sensors planted in fleets of vehicles like taxis or hauliers, from roadside sensors that monitor traffic flow, even down to subtle things like the speed that windscreen wipers are moving in the rain. But it also collects data from individuals and communities, from social media and events.

The real value comes from what happens at the back end – in the digital world.  All of this data is presented into a cloud platform, making it available for many different – as-a-service – uses. Fleet and logistics management can use it to route their traffic in the most efficient way. Individuals can use it to get simple reports of traffic. Urban authorities can use it to manage traffic control – in real time. And as we move into the future, a major application will be to link drivers to supply points for electric vehicles. The potential is vast.  Researchers at Fujitsu are using the system to map unsafe areas of the road network – based on braking information. And on another system that smooths supply and demand for the city’s taxis – so that an individual need never wait for a taxi again. For a deeper insight please see the analysis in Fujitsu’s Technology Perspectives.

This is just one example of how we see the Big Data trend playing out to benefit not only corporations and governments, but individuals in the street. For more examples of how Fujitsu is working towards the creation of a Human Centric Intelligent Society, please go to www.technology-perspectives.com and download a free copy of Technology Perspectives, developed by Fujitsu’s Global CTO Community.

 

How sustainable is ICT?

Fujitsu launched its third global benchmark report today into ICT sustainability maturity. This is a fantastic body of research that allows us to see how sustainability is progressing broadly within ICT departments, in different countries and in different industries.

The report tells us that there are challenges out there; overall Australia’s sustainability maturity is heading backwards. Why? That’s a good question and I’d be really interested to hear peoples thoughts on that. I think my top three would be:

  1. Hype is over: we had a lot of noise about “Green”. Everything and everyone was green for a while back there, even IT departments. Then we’ve learnt that it’s not quite as easy as first thought, projects need to be bedded in and maintained, they have to be part of a change program and can’t just be achieved as a tick in the box exercise.
  2.  ICT departments don’t align their strategy with the broader organisation sustainability strategy. So increased sustainability maturity is a by-product from projects and programs that they are looking to do anyway. This means we miss the opportunity to get maximum value from these projects.
  3. ICT departments are still not accountable for the power bill; while this year’s benchmark report shows that while this is improving, the majority of organisations don’t have visibility of their power bill and are not accountable for energy spend. The stats show that improvement in this metric is closely linked to better overall performance in other areas. So this one is key.

You can find the full report here

Challenges are, as we know, also opportunities. In a time of rising electricity costs, ICT departments can make a contribution to both the bottom line of the organisation as well as to its environmental performance. The Global Benchmark Report shows that many organisations today are achieving best practice and are already reaping the rewards.

Traditional values feature highly in CIO’s cloud decision making

In our first blog post for the Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand Blog, Craig Baty – our Chief Technology and Innovation Officer provides an insight into what CIOs look for in selecting a Cloud provider.

It is timely that I was given the opportunity to write this post given that Fujitsu has recently announced a Cloud contract with one of Australia’s largest port operators – Asciano Ltd.  Asciano is in the process of transforming its ICT infrastructure and to them the Cloud with the assistance of Fujitsu – is a way to change  the way the company works, its service delivery and the way it interfaces with its customers.

So what decisions do companies such as Asciano and others face when embarking on a Cloud journey? The latest edition of Insights Quarterly, a joint research initiative commissioned by Fujitsu and Microsoft  conducted by independent firm Connection Research, provides a deep dive into the minds of almost 200 Australian CIOs.

From the research there is no doubt that CIOs view Cloud Computing as the future of ICT. As my peer at Microsoft, Greg Stone (Microsoft CTO) says “cloud computing has arrived, and will continue to grow in functionality and popularity. The idea of an ‘information utility’, where generic computing power is available on demand like water or electricity, is a much closer reality.”

Cloud has reached a certain level of maturity in the enterprise, to a point where almost every CIO is more than familiar with the traditional benefits of cloud. The research shows that lower operational costs, scalability, lower capital expenditure on ICT, and flexibility and elasticity were the qualities that CIOs rated highly as the ‘Advantages of Cloud Computing’.

 

Interestingly, when CIOs were asked about how they select a cloud platform, the above factors did not rate as highly as the support from the supplier, security of data, privacy and the reputation of the supplier. Continue reading