Fujitsu Rainforest Regeneration Project plants over 1,000 trees in Borneo Rainforest

rainforest
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Our local Head of Sustainability, Lee Stewart, spent last week in the Borneo jungle planting over 1,000 trees as part of Fujitsu’s Rainforest Regeneration Project….
 
Last week I was fortunate to be one of five Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand staff who spent four days in the Borneo Jungle taking part in the Fujitsu Rainforest Regeneration Project.  Under testing conditions of 35+ degree heat with 70% humidity the team along with 50 other Fujitsu staff from over 8 different countries took part in numerous activities including measuring bio diversity, determining tree growth, maintenance and also planting seedlings.Rainforests are an extremely important part of our eco system they are responsible for around 40% of the world’s oxygen turnover. They are also nicknamed the world’s pharmacy as over a quarter of the world’s natural medicines have been discovered there. What is really amazing is that scientists still think that there may be millions of species of plants and insects that are yet to be discovered which may hold also the key to many medical cures.Lead by Fujitsu Japan the relationship with the local park in Borneo dates back over ten years and is a regular calendar event where Fujitsu staff work in collaboration with locals.  As a direct result of the work done by Fujitsu staff over the years the park now has over 39,000 new native trees.
I am pleased to report that as a result of this year’s effort a 1,000 new seedlings were planted and we reported significant growth in the existing trees and also increased levels of bio diversity.Please join me in congratulating our fellow local staff, Cara McKenna, Kim McCloghry, Sarah Retter and Cameron McDonald in taking part in this year’s Rainforest Regeneration Project and truly living the One Fujitsu sprit and values.  We look forward to next year’s tour and providing the opportunity for other Fujitsu staff from this region to experience the Borneo project.Kind Regards
 
Lee Stewart