How to Select a Device for Enterprise Mobility

Over the last few years consumer devices have overtaken enterprise devices in a lot of ways. Many of the features originally developed for the enterprise are now leveraged in mobile phones that we all have. Does this mean it’s a no-brainer when it comes to choosing a device for an enterprise mobility project? Far from it, more choice brings more debate and more confusion. While BYOD may suit many organisations and mobile solutions it’s worth looking carefully at your own situation to determine which devices are appropriate.

Obviously amongst the fields of consumer and enterprise mobile devices there is a lot of variety and the technology is changing rapidly. What does stay more or less constant is that businesses want to get value for money. I’ll cover some of the key points to help you make up your own mind about what is right for your initiative. I’d suggest making a decision based on a good understanding of the current and future requirements. A good way to do this is by using a discovery, questionnaire, and/or workshop process. Try to ascertain what you can in the following areas:

Who are the mobile users?
When formulating a strategy for device selection I normally start with the user roles. For example:

  • Executives
  • Sales People
  • Customers
  • Subcontractors
  • Service Staff
  • IT personnel
  • Consumers
What will each user group do with the device?
You might find a 1:1 match between use cases and users but normally there is some cross over, so it’s important to understand what will be done with the devices. Here’s some examples:
  • Click through work flows
  • Create content or enter lots of text
  • Scan goods with a bar code or RFID
  • Capture a customer’s signature
  • View large documents
  • Take photographs of problems
  • Search on the Internet for information
  • Use mapping or Geo location services
 Where and when will they use the device?
Of course the environment may vary within a user group. This might be the time when you determine sub-groups with slightly different needs. Thinking about the following use profiles may help you determine battery life, or IP rating requirements.
  • In and around the city
  • In rural areas
  • Underground
  • In a vehicle or forklift
  • In wet areas, in the desert, in high temperatures
  • With chemicals or explosives
  • Occasional phone calls
  • All day data entry

What are the needs of the software?
You may have covered this stuff when evaluating the use cases, however its good to cross check and consider any technical requirements that you will have for the devices:

  • Particular operating system or version
  • Browser that supports HTML5
  • Anti Virus
  • Offline Database
  • Storage capacity
  • CPU type
  • Connectivity (Bluetooth, serial, usb)
  • Printing

OK that’s a lot of questions but once you have a handle on these areas you can map user groups, use cases, and form factors to help identify which device styles suit your business.  Often I do that in a spread-sheet format and if necessary you can apply weighting values to certain characteristics. So out of this work you should be able to determine the base requirements list for each device. Something like the following:

What are the device requirements?

  • Screen Size
  • Input Method
  • Peripherals
  • Battery Life
  • 4G/LTE/Wifi
  • Ruggedized or not

Let’s not forget the non-functional, procurement, and policy type requirements you may have in your organisation. For example: Continue reading

Ion Drives, Asteroid Mining and Artificial Intelligence – Science Fiction or Reality?

Sometimes we don’t realise how far we have really come in terms of technology. For example last year we celebrated the 20th anniversary of the first ever text message to a mobile phone (incidentally the message was “Merry Christmas”). Now we take text messages for granted in our personal and business lives, and text messaging as a technology is often seen as a technology nearing the end of its useful life. We’ve also seen the emergence of Twitter in a relatively short period to the point that it is now playing a role in crime fighting, and also being used extensively by public figures including The Pope!

A hundred years ago the mobile phone, let alone text messaging, would not have been dreamed of –  and now it is very much a part of our everyday life. It is interesting to speculate about what what we dream today becoming everyday life tomorrow. Science fiction writers do it all the time!

We live in a truly amazing time!

Much of what used to be thought of as science fiction has actually happened – but a lot of it is still to take place. In the past, the ideas and inspiration about what the future would look like came mostly from science fiction writers like Jules Verne, HG Wells, Mary Shelley, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Arthur C. Clarke, Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, George Orwell, E.E.’Doc’ Smith, Larry Niven and Robert Heinlein to name a few. They predicted or envisaged the following advances many decades or even a century before technology was capable of producing them:

  • Space Travel
  • Satellites
  • The Internet
  • Fax Machines
  • Nano Technology
  • Ubiquitous Video Communication
  • Mass Surveillance Systems
  • Supercomputers
  • Subsea Habitats and Exploration
  • Stealth Technology
  • Personal Area Networks
  • Cloud Computing

However, many predictions such as robots and artificial intelligence still have some way to go before they can match Asimov’s portrayal of robots or come anywhere even needing the 3 Laws of Robotics*, but we have recently seen advances that will potentially allow an AI to sit an entrance exam to Tokyo University. Continue reading