7 Must-Knows When Considering a Data Centre Solution

Aampliy_Blog_PRIMERGYInformation and communications technology downtime and delays are on average costing businesses $9000 per minute ($540,000 per hour) according to the Ponemon Institute. The financial services sector took top honours with nearly a million dollars in costs per outage.

But it’s not all bad news.

The cost of fixing the problem is relatively small, as a little investment in increasing the reliability of ICT will provide ROI by reducing productivity and revenue losses – and Investment in the Australian data centre services market is predicted to grow at a CAGR of 12.4% in the next 5 years.

This is essential in today’s fast world of big data which is leaving old ICT systems further and further behind. With Australian enterprises putting an increasing focus on scalability, standards, and security, legacy systems just don’t cut it. Combine this with the fact that companies are lacking the expert knowledge and services to keep up with swift IT advances and you have a landscape full of laggards, not leaders.

As such, one of the most challenging aspects faced by the CIOs is how to keep their IT strategy aligned with the business strategy, and their aged data centres upgraded and running with efficiency.

Improving overall data centre functionality and performance calls for modernising your existing data centre through the latest technologies, infrastructure and services. A data centre which is highly responsive, agile and sustainable, reduces operational costs, risk and is future proofed for expansion.

Your data centre has the potential to drive your business forward and help you be a leader in this fast-paced world. Here are our top 7 must-knows when considering a data centre solution:

  1. Scalability

One of the major benefits you can bring to your business with a robust data centre solution is the ability to add data storage capacity to meet your emerging business requirements.  This means you pay only for the capacity you need, knowing that you can easily scale to meet increasing data volume demands.

  1. Security

Maintaining the confidentiality, integrity and availability of information is critical to the success of your organisation. Place your information in a facility that offers state-of-the-art digital surveillance and security equipment for prevention of unauthorised access. Consider measures, such as biometric access points, 24-hour on-site security controls, integrated access management and CCTV systems.

  1. Reliability & High Availability

Reliability and high availability are not the same. For example, a reliable system that takes a long time to fix if something fails does not have high availability. Data centres that have both are those that are engineered to international standards of excellence ensuring appropriate controls are in place.

Keep these key national standards for data centre facilities in mind when looking at your options:

  • Information Security Management Systems (ISMS) ISO 27001
  • Government Security Standards
  • Environmental Management System ISO 14001
  • ITIL IT Service Management
  • ISO 9001 Quality System
  1. Energy Efficiency

Having reliable and high-performance computing power is a crucial aspect of running your business effectively and competitively. It is also highly energy intensive. In Australia, the NABERS Energy rating for data centres can help CIOs, IT Managers and tenants assess energy performance for an outsourced data centre reliably and as a comparison point with other data centres within Australia.

This provides a way for data centre energy efficiency to be externally validated against a standard by an independent government assessor.

  1. Services

Choose a flexible provider who can offer professional expertise, support and services as your business and circumstance change, including:

  • Co-location services
  • Add-on services – On-site services, such as remote hands and media management
  • Project services – Relocation, installation and consolidation from your premises or third party location into a managed data centre
  • Managed services – End-to-end delivery of services and support.
  1. Servers

Servers are the big users of energy in a data centre which is why you achieve greater efficiency by running those that consume less power but still provide best-in-class performance. Your data centre provider can run theirs, or you can supply your own for use in a facility, but it’s critical to opt for servers which will allow you to deliver at the speed your enterprise demands. Bookmark this reference to Fujitsu PRIMERGY servers as a good starting point.

  1. Location

If you’re considering a co-location data centre solution, the location of the facility (or facilities) you will use is an integral factor. If someone from your company will be upgrading or servicing your equipment when needed, you need easy access to this location. Another aspect to keep in mind when assessing locations is to investigate the likelihood of natural disasters and what redundancy operations are in place.

Keep pace with the world moving at a digital speed and be the leader, not the laggard. Fast track your data centre modernisation by understanding the key transformation factors.

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What do Helsinki and Stockholm have in common with Melbourne?

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Helsinki

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Helsinki

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Stockholm
Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Stockholm

 

 

 

 

 

 

What DO they have in common?

They are all stops on this year’s Fujitsu World Tour.  With only two weeks to go before the Melbourne event, we would like to share with you some footage from the events held so far. The Fujitsu World Tour 2015 started in Helsinki, Finland and then moved on to Stockholm, Sweden.

As you can see from the videos, we are setting up for a feature-packed program including international thought leaders, innovative technology delivering one of the region’s most comprehensive technology exhibitions.

The theme of this year’s event is Human Centric Innovation, which focuses on how technology can impact the way we live and work in an increasingly hyperconnected world.

If you are in any way responsible for contributing to your organisation’s ICT strategy, this conference will provide some valuable insight into what to expect over the next few years.  Our international thought leaders will present their insights on topics such as The Internet of Things and also give you a glimpse into The Future of ICT.

So if you are interested in finding out how ICT will impact the way we live and work, register now as there are limited places available for this exciting event.

Transition to enterprise mobility – a cultural change

Mobilizing1The focus of mobility and implementing an enterprise mobility solution tends to be on the technology itself. New devices, new apps, and ubiquitous secure access are all delivered through technology. However, the introduction of these technologies will fall well short of business expectations of improved productivity, collaboration and morale, without a parallel program of behavioural education and change management.

Fujitsu recognises that the delivery of IT capability must be fully integrated with a programme of business transformation if the target benefits and value are to be achieved. We work with clients to drive the change and can provide skills and advice to complement client’s own capabilities.

Our Transformation Framework
We think that the outcomes you should expect from a successful transformation are:

  • New ways of working have become “business as usual”.
  • Enhanced technology platform is an enabler of future business capabilities.
  • Your organisation recognises that the target benefits have been realised and that the contribution to your strategy and your future operating model have been achieved.
  • Your organisation now embraces change and further improvements are being actively sought.

We have strong underpinning capabilities in process improvement such as lean transformation, business change, organisation design and benefits realisation, as well as technology and applications. This is combined with deep functional expertise in HR, IT, procurement, customer experience and, finance and accounting.

For more information on Fujitsu Mobility go to: http://www.fujitsu.com/global/services/infrastructure/end-user-services/mobilize-workforce/

Insights Quarterly – Focus on Applications and Security in Australia

 Applications and Security

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The latest edition of Insights Quarterly, a joint research initiative between Fujitsu and Microsoft, focuses on the much discussed topic of Application Security. The research, which is the result of surveying over 100 Australian CIOs confirms that security is no longer a second-level issue for CIOs – it is now well and truly top of mind. This concern is largely in the light of increased mobility.  Many organisations are having trouble addressing security issues and accommodating requirements such as support for Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) strategies.

Interestingly, despite strong concerns about all aspects of security, many user organisations are having difficulty addressing the issues. This is often because security only becomes a pressing concern once systems are compromised, and because many classes of security threats are comparatively new and there is a low level of awareness about how to deal with them.

Other findings of the report are that cloud computing is now considered ‘mainstream’, applications are migrating very quickly to mobile platforms and the cloud, and packaged software is becoming the norm.

The research is published on the Insights Quarterly Website: http://www.insightsquarterly.com.au, which contains the current and past reports as well as supporting research notes and PowerPoint presentations.

It’s shopping Jim, but not as we know it!

This article reproduced from a paper by David Concordel, Senior Vice President Global Retail, Fujitsu.

David Concordel

David Concordel, Senior Vice President Global Retail, Fujitsu

Customer, shop, merchandise, transaction – that’s all there is to it. Shopping – in simple terms – has changed little in two thousand years. However, on closer inspection, the shopping ‘process’ is undergoing a fundamental transformation for customers, retailers and their suppliers. Says Fujitsu’s David Concordel, in the new omni-channel world of shopping – where customers can buy online or via a smart phone and pick up their order in store or have it delivered – retailers will be re-engineering their shopping process in 2014 and beyond to drive future revenues and ensure their business continuity.

“In 2014, fast-followers will chase the 50 global retailers already transforming store, mobile, and ecommerce channels, supply chains, merchandizing, and marketing for the omni-channel customer experience.” This is the #1 prediction made in December 2013 for the global retail sector this year from IDC Retail Insights. It also has the most immediate and arguably the highest impact of IDC’s 10 predictions, in terms of the cost and complexity involved in addressing the issue across every retailer’s entire business.

Analysts are inventing new labels every day – multi-channel, omni-channel, ‘stop-start’ shopping and clienteling – to try to describe what is happening in few words. Fujitsu sees it from the customer’s point of view. There is only one shopping channel – ‘my channel’ – and retailers need to operate their businesses in response to how every customer chooses to shop with them. The store no longer has walls, shopping is ‘everywhere.’ Retailers need to rethink how they set up shop.

New customer-centric operating models, underpinned by new IT architectures, data models and business processes, need to evolve in response to the changes we are experiencing today. Bolting on click ‘n’ collect services to a store model, manually sharing stock across physical and virtual stores, responding to shopper behavior overnight rather than real time – these are no longer viable. A fundamentally new approach is required that will help the ‘fast-followers’ to catch up with the best of the rest.

Customers want ‘old world’ service in a ‘new world’ environment

Technology is driving change not because it appeals to the latent ‘geek’ mentality among the world’s shoppers. This isn’t a Big Bang Theory retailing trend. Technology – primarily the smart phone – is driving change because it is helping customers rediscover a more intimate, personalized and ‘in control’ shopping experience. Revolution is about returning to a bygone age. Customers want the one-on-one personal service, reminiscent of the ‘mom ‘n’ pop’ shops of 50s America, but they want it re-presented and re-delivered for a modern technological age. This may or may not involve human intervention. Continue reading

The cloud is complex, so businesses need a partner they can trust

cameron mcnaughtCameron McNaught , EVP, Solutions, International Business, Fujitsu Limited talks about the challenges organisations face when moving to the Cloud.

There’s no doubt that cloud technologies help organizations to meet the current and future challenges to modernize their Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and innovate new business offerings. But, says Fujitsu’s Cameron McNaught, the cloud is intrinsically complex – one size does not fit all. The best approach is to find a partner that can provide the consulting expertise and managed services that can be customized to every organization’s unique needs and budget.

Ask ten people to define the cloud and you get ten different answers. The cloud is such a simple term, but there are so many variations – public clouds, private clouds, external clouds, vertical clouds, even hybrid clouds. Not to mention a number of related terms such as Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), and more.

Though business leaders might differ on defining the cloud, almost all agree that it’s a necessary step in keeping up with business growth and marketplace competition. In fact, the cloud is one of the hottest topics in business transformation today.

It’s not difficult to figure out why. Today’s business leaders are increasingly squeezed by two types of business challenges. On the one hand, their businesses require greater efficiency due to budget constraints. There’s a need to rein in spending and focus on margins. At the same time, new technologies create unprecedented opportunities to grow revenue, expand services, and enter new markets. It’s up to them to determine how to balance these two types of challenges: And one thing is clear – the old, traditional systems and processes can no longer meet the new challenges.

 The cloud can and does address these challenges. A well-executed cloud strategy results in several important benefits. These include: 

  • Innovation, as companies that invest in business-enhancing technology to serve customers, generate revenue, or deliver products and services are more likely to stay ahead of the competition. Global trends including big data, social business and mobile mean organizations of every description need to ‘innovate or die.’
  • Business agility, by taking advantage of new ways of doing things which were not previously possible, and due to a modernized and often globalized cloud or hybrid ICT infrastructure. 
  • High availability, because in a global environment, business is conducted ‘24×7.’ Customers, suppliers, and employees expect to be able to access their applications any time, from anywhere, and they have little tolerance for downtime, whether for planned maintenance or unexpected disaster. This also results from the ability to easily replicate and move workloads, enterprises are incorporating the cloud into their disaster recovery and business continuity planning.  Continue reading