Canon in the Cloud – Proudly powered by Fujitsu

canon-fujitsu-signingLast week Canon Australia and Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand announced a partnership to host Canon’s ‘Therefore Online’ workflow and document management software on Fujitsu’s Trusted Public S5 Cloud Platform. Therefore Online is an extension of Canon’s ‘Therefore’ software platform, which is designed to provide an ‘electronic filing cabinet’ across various sources of information including paper documents, electronic files, barcodes, email, internet forms and XML files.
                     
Therefore Online is the first of Canon Australia’s applications to be hosted in the cloud, and will pave the way for a new suite of cloud-based offerings that will allow the delivery of the applications to consumers on a cost-effective subscription model. Originally targeted at the small to medium business (SMB) market, the platform is scalable to organisations of all sizes.
 
For more information please see the Press Release.
 

Fujitsu Rainforest Regeneration Project plants over 1,000 trees in Borneo Rainforest

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Our local Head of Sustainability, Lee Stewart, spent last week in the Borneo jungle planting over 1,000 trees as part of Fujitsu’s Rainforest Regeneration Project….
 
Last week I was fortunate to be one of five Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand staff who spent four days in the Borneo Jungle taking part in the Fujitsu Rainforest Regeneration Project.  Under testing conditions of 35+ degree heat with 70% humidity the team along with 50 other Fujitsu staff from over 8 different countries took part in numerous activities including measuring bio diversity, determining tree growth, maintenance and also planting seedlings.Rainforests are an extremely important part of our eco system they are responsible for around 40% of the world’s oxygen turnover. They are also nicknamed the world’s pharmacy as over a quarter of the world’s natural medicines have been discovered there. What is really amazing is that scientists still think that there may be millions of species of plants and insects that are yet to be discovered which may hold also the key to many medical cures.Lead by Fujitsu Japan the relationship with the local park in Borneo dates back over ten years and is a regular calendar event where Fujitsu staff work in collaboration with locals.  As a direct result of the work done by Fujitsu staff over the years the park now has over 39,000 new native trees.

‘Thunder God’ officially unleashed!

Supercomputer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In September last year we announced that Fujitsu had been selected to supply Australia’s most powerful computer to the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) located at the Australian National University (ANU). The computer – named ‘Raijin’, which translates to ‘Thunder God’ in Japanese, was officially launched today at the opening of the NCI high performance computing centre.

The 1.2 Petaflop Fujitsu PRIMERGY cluster is one of the most powerful  in the world and now provides high-end computational services to the Australian research community.
 
With peak performance speeds of 1.2 PetaFlops – 1,200,000,000,000,000 floating point operations per second, the new computer has the power of 56,000 computers working in parallel, and the disk storage equivalent of 20,000 computers but working much faster. It can perform the same number of calculations in one hour that every one of the 7 billion humans on Earth, armed with calculators, could perform in 20 years – or 170,000 calculations per second, per person on Earth.
 
You may recall that Fujitsu and ANU commissioned a time lapse video of the supercomputer being built – click here to watch the video.
 
The NCI is supported by a $50 million grant under the Australian Government’s Super Science Initiative. Raijin’s speed is taking the Australia’s research capacity to new levels with Commonwealth agencies such as the Bureau of Meteorology, the CSIRO and Geoscience Australia to run complex weather and climate modelling, and research in computational chemistry, particle physics, astronomy, material science, microbiology, nanotechnology and photonics.
Raijin is the largest x86 HPC installation of any brand in the southern hemisphere and the largest Fujitsu PRIMERGY deployment worldwide. The innovative design of Raijin, which utilises industry standard hardware, saw it delivered and commissioned as budgeted. 

In the press release issued by Fujitsu Professor Lindsay Botten, Director of the NCI said “Advanced computational methods form an increasingly essential component of high-impact research, in many cases underpinning discoveries that cannot be achieved by other means, as well as the platform with which to sustain innovation at an internationally competitive level. NCI welcomes the opportunity to continue to build a substantive collaborative relationship with Fujitsu, the peak system vendor, with a focus particularly on the optimisation of Australia’s primary modelling suite.” 

Important Statistics

  • Fujitsu PRIMERGY x86 High Performance Computing (HPC) technology is based on commodity hardware, which delivers improved price/performance; access to a greater range of ISV applications; and simplified the migration process from existing x86 applications.
  • Processor cores: 57,472 (Intel Xeon Sandy Bridge, 2.6 GHz)
    Main Memory: 160 TBytes
    Disk Storage: 10 PBytes
    Peak Performance: 1195 TFlops
    Available Resource: 503M core hours per annum
  • Raijin is capable of peak performance speeds of 1.2 PetaFlops – 1,200,000,000,000,000 floating point operations per second.
  • The installation of Raijin was undertaken by Fujitsu’s combined supercomputing expertise from Australia and Japan with support from Fujitsu Australia engineering teams and project partners.
  • The NCI is supported by a $50 million grant under the Australian Government’s Super Science Initiative. Its operation is sustained through co-investment by a number of partner organisations including the ANU, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), Geoscience Australia and other research-intensive universities supported by the Australian Research Council. Researcher access to NCI facilities and services is also supported by the ARC and a number of Australia’s research intensive universities.
 

 

The cloud is complex, so businesses need a partner they can trust

cameron mcnaughtCameron McNaught , EVP, Solutions, International Business, Fujitsu Limited talks about the challenges organisations face when moving to the Cloud.

There’s no doubt that cloud technologies help organizations to meet the current and future challenges to modernize their Information and Communications Technology (ICT) and innovate new business offerings. But, says Fujitsu’s Cameron McNaught, the cloud is intrinsically complex – one size does not fit all. The best approach is to find a partner that can provide the consulting expertise and managed services that can be customized to every organization’s unique needs and budget.

Ask ten people to define the cloud and you get ten different answers. The cloud is such a simple term, but there are so many variations – public clouds, private clouds, external clouds, vertical clouds, even hybrid clouds. Not to mention a number of related terms such as Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), Software as a Service (SaaS), and more.

Though business leaders might differ on defining the cloud, almost all agree that it’s a necessary step in keeping up with business growth and marketplace competition. In fact, the cloud is one of the hottest topics in business transformation today.

It’s not difficult to figure out why. Today’s business leaders are increasingly squeezed by two types of business challenges. On the one hand, their businesses require greater efficiency due to budget constraints. There’s a need to rein in spending and focus on margins. At the same time, new technologies create unprecedented opportunities to grow revenue, expand services, and enter new markets. It’s up to them to determine how to balance these two types of challenges: And one thing is clear – the old, traditional systems and processes can no longer meet the new challenges.

 The cloud can and does address these challenges. A well-executed cloud strategy results in several important benefits. These include: 

  • Innovation, as companies that invest in business-enhancing technology to serve customers, generate revenue, or deliver products and services are more likely to stay ahead of the competition. Global trends including big data, social business and mobile mean organizations of every description need to ‘innovate or die.’
  • Business agility, by taking advantage of new ways of doing things which were not previously possible, and due to a modernized and often globalized cloud or hybrid ICT infrastructure. 
  • High availability, because in a global environment, business is conducted ‘24×7.’ Customers, suppliers, and employees expect to be able to access their applications any time, from anywhere, and they have little tolerance for downtime, whether for planned maintenance or unexpected disaster. This also results from the ability to easily replicate and move workloads, enterprises are incorporating the cloud into their disaster recovery and business continuity planning.  Continue reading

Celebrating 40 years of Fujitsu in Australia and New Zealand

history
To celebrate its 40th Anniversary in Australia, Fujitsu has launched an eBook documenting its history over the last 40 years.  Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand – The First 40 Years, was written by well-known journalist and analyst Graeme Philipson. The book covers the highlights of Fujitsu’s first 40 years in Australia. The book tells the story of how the company has grown to become part of the Australian and New Zealand ICT landscape.
 
Today Fujitsu officially announced the launch of the eBook at the Establishment Hotel in Sydney. The launch was attended by around 40 people including journalists, analysts, Fujitsu executives, as well as a number of long-standing employees. One of the highlights of the launch event was the attendance of 5 of the 6 past and present CEOs and Managing Directors of Fujitsu Australia.
 
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In the picture above are Mike Rydon (Managing Director 1973-1985), George Ranucci (Managing Director 1985-1989), Rod Vawdrey (CEO 2003-2011 and current President of International Business), Neville Roach (Managing Director 1989-2000) and current CEO Mike Foster.
 
The launch event included an address by Keith Besgrove (on behalf of former Senator Stephen Conroy who wrote the foreword to the book), an overview of the book by Graeme Philipson, a business update by Mike Foster and an insight into Fujitsu’s global business by Rod Vawdrey. 
 
The eBook can be found at:
 

Customer Service Focus reaps rewards

Some time ago John Schumacher posted an article about Creating Customer Service from the Ground Up – Not just an afterthought, embed it into the culture. In his post he spoke about Fujitsu’s ROC programme, which is based on the principles of Responsiveness, Ownership and Communication.

Fujitsu wins Paragon Award for Innovation ExcellenceWe are pleased to say that this week Fujitsu was presented with the Service Provider Innovation Excellence Award at the ISG Awards in Sydney.  The Award was in recognition of the great work the Fujitsu Managed Services team has done with the ROC Programme. This continues a run of external recognition for this excellent programme including at the ITSMFA Awards, Customer Service Institute Awards and LearnX Awards.

 If you would like to find out more about the ROC programme, view this video.

A perspective on technology trends for 2013

At Fujitsu, we believe passionately that innovation in technology is our route to secure a better future. We have an ambitious vision; we call it Human Centric Intelligent Society. Human Centric Intelligent Society is about building a better, more sustainable society through the power of ICT. It means putting people at the heart of the world, and using technology to deliver innovation into everything we do. It means powering business and society with information and bringing together the physical and digital to deliver greater benefit across society. And it means orchestrating technology from end to end to deliver greater understanding and control of the world around us.

In line with this vision we are pleased to announce our new Technology Perspectives website. Technology Perspectives is a collection of articles that represent the views and experience of key people from Fujitsu around the world including myself. We look at the many different ways in which technology is shaping our world in 2013 across a broad range of topics. We investigate the continually evolving relationship between the business world and technology, and the opportunities that will arise.

There is a wealth of information in this resource and I encourage you to read it and to use it as a reference for strategy and planning. We will spend some time on this blog during the year exploring some of the topics in more detail.

I would be very interested in hearing your feedback on this resource – please send any feedback to me via the comment form below.

Can a computer pass a University Entrance Exam?

Fujitsu CTO Craig Baty talks about Fujitsu’s quest to build an advanced Artificial Intelligence (AI) Undergraduate

Fujitsu Laboratories and Japan’s National Institute of Informatics (NII) will take part in an artificial brain project, known as “Can a Robot Pass the University of Tokyo (Todai) Entrance Exam?”, otherwise known as “Todai Robot.” Based on formula manipulation and computer algebra technology, Fujitsu Laboratories will participate as the math team for the project.

Led by NII professor Noriko Arai, Todai Robot was started in 2011. The goal is to enable an artificial brain to score high marks in the Japanese National Center for University Entrance Examinations by 2016, and to cross the admission threshold for Todai by 2021.
For many years, Fujitsu Laboratories has been researching formula manipulation and computer algebra for solving mathematical problems related to mathematical analysis and optimisation technologies. Fujitsu’s involvement in the Todai Robot math team is a way to develop technologies required for human-centric ICT. Technologies developed under this project should enable anyone to easily use sophisticated mathematical analysis tools, leading to solutions for a wide range of real-world problems, and the automation of mathematical analysis and optimization.

The project aims to increase the accuracy of elemental AI technologies developed to date, and integrate them to create future value in information technology, while also deepening our comprehensive understanding of human thought.

For a computer to solve math entrance-exam problems (1), it must first convert the problem text (expressed in natural language and formulas easily understood by humans), into a program executeable form. The next step is for a program known as a “solver” to solve the problem. This requires three processes as shown in the diagram below.

Procedure for solving the math problem

Getting a computer to understand text that was intended for humans is not an easy task. Using natural-language processing to draw out a semantic representation of the problem text is not simply a matter of analyzing the words. It also involves skillfully integrating mathematical terminology and a high-school level understanding of math. Beyond that, it needs to decide the best way for the computer to solve the problem. Currently only approximately 50–60% of Level 2 entrance-exam problems can be solved, even using computer algebra technology, so the challenge of the project is to improve the algorithm.

 Notes:

  1. Math Problems. Math entrance-exam problems are high-school math problems been contributed by the Benesse Corporation, Tokyo Shoseki Co., Ltd., and JC Educational Institute, Inc
  2. The initiatives of the math team are scheduled to be detailed in “Uniting Natural Language Processing and Computer Algebra to Solve Mathematics Problems” (Akiko Aizawa, Takuya Matsuzaki, Hirokazu Anai), a paper in a special issue on the Todai Robot project in vol. 27, no. 5 of the Journal of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence.

See Australia’s fastest supercomputer being built

Earlier this year we announced that the Australian National University (ANU) has selected Fujitsu to supply and install a High Performance Computer (HPC) for the National Computing Infrastructure (NCI) project.

The Fujitsu Primergy cluster high-performance supercomputer was constructed at the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) in late 2012. This machine debuted at number 24 on the World Top 500 Supercomputer ranking. This means it is ranked as the 24th most powerful computer in the World, and also the fastest computer in Australia. The NCI computer uses technology developed for Japan’s ‘K’ Computer, which was until recently the world’s fastest computer.

Australia's fastest computer being builtIf you are interested in seeing Australia’s fastest supercomputer being built, click here to see our time-lapse video of the computer coming together from an empty data centre through to a fully functioning supercomputer. The video compresses almost three months of installation activity into approximately one minute of video.

To express the power and scope of this machine in terms we all understand, here are a few key statistics:

  • It has 57,000 cores, which is the equivalent of approximately 15,000 home PC’s
  • 160 terabytes of RAM = approximately 40,000 home PC’s
  • 10 petabytes of hard disc = 10,000 PC hard drives
  • 1,200 teraflops of peak computational performance = 5 months worth of calculations by 1 billion people armed with calculators, in just 1 second.
  • 9 terabyes of network = 9 million home internet bandwidth connections

At the NCI, we can be assured that this computer will be put to good use in support of a wide range of research initiatives across the region. NCI’s advanced computing infrastructure is funded through programs of the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education, while its operations are sustained through the substantial co-investment by a number of partner organisations including ANU, CSIRO, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Geoscience Australia, a number of Australia’s research-intensive universities, and the Australian Research Council.

For ICT companies such as Fujitsu, development of supercomputing technology can be likened to the development of Formula One cars by the large car companies. Concepts proven in this field can be adapted to more mainstream applications that benefit the general public. For Fujitsu the K-computer in Tokyo, which is a joint project between RIKEN and Fujitsu, has laid the foundations for much of Fujitsu’s future commercial endeavours.

Mr Yamada, Head of Fujitsu’s Supercomputing business describes the advancements well when he describes the processing power of the K-Computer in this video. Until recently the K Computer was the world’s fastest computer.

Imagine a football stadium filled with 50,000 people. They all have a calculator in their hand and start a calculation together doing one operation per second. What would take this group 6,340 years would take the K Computer only one second.

While it is easy to be consumed by discussions about processing power it is far more interesting to look at what this means in terms of its impact on the world. In medical science for example, it has for a long time been possible to create a simulation of the human heart for research purposes. Today’s supercomputing power enables us to take this one step further – rather than modelling a generic heart we can now quickly process a person’s vital signs and create a model of the individual heart. This means that we can now model the effects of an operation on the individual’s heart to simulate its reactions to an operation before we operate! Essentially the gain is in being able to process, model and simulate in a matter of days, not months or years – making the technology available on a wider scale. Similar examples can be found in a number of other fields including mineral exploration and predicting the effects of natual disasters such as tsunamis.

 

Fujitsu Cloud keeps dogs fit and healthy!

Wandant Dog PedometerEvery week we are seeing interesting and innovative new ways that cloud computing is helping us in our day-to-day lives. This week was no exception, with Fujitsu announcing the release of the ‘Wandant‘ dog pedometer, which was developed by Fujitsu Laboratories.

The Wandant uses a combination of motion-tracking technology(and an associated cloud service) that supports health management for dogs—the first of its kind in the pet care industry. It uses the same sensing technologies developed for use in mobile phones incorporated into a tag worn on the dog’s collar, which automatically measures and records the number of steps taken, shivering motions, and temperature changes. This data is collected in the cloud and presented as a graphic on a website that reports trends in the dog’s activities that are easy to understand at a glance, facilitating management of the dog’s health and preventing obesity.

 As high-speed broadband becomes ubiquitous thanks to networks such as Australia’s National Broadband Network we are sure to see more cloud enabled innovation such as in this example.