The Fujitsu World Tour countdown is on!

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After months of planning and preparation Fujitsu World Tour is headed down under! We are two weeks out from Fujitsu World Tour Auckland (Tuesday 20th June) and Melbourne (Thursday 22nd June)…the countdown is on!

We are excited to host the biggest event for Fujitsu Australia & New Zealand in Auckland this year – a first for New Zealand! We have had great interest in the event so far, with over 300 people already registered for Auckland and over 600 in Melbourne. And we are expecting more to come as we get closer to the event.

The overarching theme of the tour is Human Centric Innovation: Digital Co-creation, which is central to Fujitsu’s partnership approach with its customers, partners and suppliers. Through a series of expert talks, breakout sessions and technology showcases, the event will demonstrate new ways of using ICT – including the Internet of Things, Hybrid IT and other Digital Technologies – to benefit business and society as a whole.

Leading experts, such as The Hon Philip Dalidakis, Victorian MP for Small Business, Innovation and Trade will present in Melbourne, with keynote speakers Yoshikuni Takashige, Visionary Architect of Fujitsu, Ramanan Ramakrishna Head of Service Innovation & Portfolio Managed Infrastructure Services, and Steve Walker, APAC CIO of DHL presenting at both our Auckland and Melbourne events.

Below are a few of the fantastic innovations that will be on display at the event:

Spatiowl – Derived from the prefix “Spatio,” meaning “space,” combined with “Owl,” an ancient symbol of wisdom, Spatiowl is a powerful service for integrated management of transportation systems using Big Data analytics and Cloud Computing technology. The technology can collate date from sources such as public transportation, vehicles, and pedestrians’ smartphones in urban areas through sensors.

spatiowl

Interactive Shoe Hub – Fujitsu’s ‘Smart Shoes’ enable anyone to collect, collate and analyse sensor data from the shoes they wear everyday. All sorts of information is collected by sensors embedded in the shoes, including movement of the feet, pressure and curvature.

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Ubiquitousware – this is an IoT Solution which includes the Head Mounted Display (used for HMD remote support) and Worker Safety (a vital sensing demo and Amplify interface will be displayed). Both technologies aim to sense the status of people, things and surrounding environments.

headmount

At Fujitsu World Tour, we are giving participants an interactive experience to help drive digital transformation. The co-creation station will provide an example of how Fujitsu works with customers to help solve current and future business challenges. Come and shape the future of technology and become a #cocreationist. Our experiential zone will also feature innovations and solutions for use within our key verticals.

It’s not too late to register – we welcome you to attend this fantastic event! And if you do, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter here for live updates from the tour and use the hashtag #FujitsuWorldTour to join the conversation and see your post appear on our Live Twitter Wall at the event!

Demystifying ‘Fast IT’

As the pace of business changes at an ever-increasing rate, there are increasing demands on IT systems to support continual change. From an IT perspective we need to be ‘on the front foot’ to anticipate the needs of the business. One of the terms we will hear more regularly is that of ‘Fast IT’. We caught up with two of our leading architects, Ramy Ibrahim and Charles Ponniah to get a further insight into the concept of Fast IT and how organisations can embrace it.

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From Left: Ramy Ibrahim, Charles Ponniah.

Can you explain what FAST IT is?

Ramy: Fast IT is a relatively new term. It’s about the new way of delivering IT services. It is a way of thinking that will enable rapid innovation in a business. It’s about providing that experience that consumers traditionally get, that corporate IT departments always seem to slow down.

Why is it important to move to Fast IT?

Ramy: It is about the user experience. If the user experience isn’t up to the standards that users expect, they will find a way around it. The key thing is making sure you meet the internal metrics such as security governance and delivery method, but also ensuring that it delivers a good user experience.

Charles: It is also about enablement. At Fujitsu, our focus is on getting people onto the technology faster to enable them to produce things in a more creative or faster way.

How do organisations stand to benefit from adopting Fast IT?

Charles It is all about unleashing ability, efficiency, productivity and creativity. It is about having the ability and capabilities to outpace your competition. Late last year we conducted a “Hackathon” with our employees from across Australia and New Zealand. As a result of this concentrated effort over two days we identified a number of viable products that we could look to commercialise. This is a great example of how organisations can benefit from this approach rather than the traditional models of development. Continue reading

Revolution causes disruption in information technology

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Most people we know are busy with all the usual stuff of daily life – unaware there is a huge revolution going on.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is right now.

The increasing fusion of the physical and digital worlds at the heart of this revolution can be seen in connected cars, smart homes, increasing types of intelligent devices, growing numbers of sensors, and so on.

This revolution is not a change, it’s a disruption.

In the midst of this disruption, data centres, although still collecting and processing more data than ever, are becoming defined not by hardware, but by software. But they must still have the right hardware. When it comes to computing power, the agile aggregation of performance is vital.

In agile aggregation, development is not linear, with one end result, but happens by advances, stage by stage, all the time. Managers and leaders also need accurate and quick information, and agile business intelligence gives them what they need.

The upshot? Today’s data centres work best with all-modular, virtualised industry-standard servers. Just as well, as new models of data storage are critical to riding out any disruption.

As all-flash arrays become the default option in IT storage, Fujitsu are launching a new era with our flash-first model, with SolidFire and Netapp.

This all-flash array is a solid state storage disk system, meaning it has multiple flash memory drives instead of spinning disk drives. It has no moving parts and can transfer data much faster than traditional electro-mechanical disk drives.

Software-defined systems meet the almost unimaginable demands of hyper-scale storage.

High density will be a feature of servers in hyper-scale setups, saving money and cutting costs. SolidFire is all-modular, so it can meet the needs of small business, yet has hyper-scale functionality, so it can deal with huge demands.

SolidFire also:

  • reduces power consumption
  • increases the dissipation of heat, and
  • offers extreme flexibility and dynamism in network connectivity.

SolidFire’s scale-out architecture, Quality of Service (QoS) capabilities and hardware compatibility-guarantee give our customers what they need. These include:

Scale out: From tens of terabytes to multiple petabytes. Non-disruptive, no downtime scaling.

Complete automation: Comprehensive application programme interfaces and cloud-based monitoring. Instant provisioning. Automatic data distribution and load balancing.

Guaranteed Quality of Service: Independent control of storage performance and capacity. Real-time performance management. Fine-grain QoS settings (faster transactions).

Data assurance: 256-bit encryption at rest. Self-healing drive and node rebuilds. Rapid, space-efficient snapshots and clones. Real-time replication.

Global efficiencies: Inline and post-process compression. Always-on de-duplication (eliminating unnecessary information). No performance impact. Global thin provisioning (total user capacity allocated only as virtual storage; actual physical disk capacity allocated as and when needed).

To learn more about using SolidFire and being ready for the Fourth Industrial Revolution disruption, check out this white paper.

What do Helsinki and Stockholm have in common with Melbourne?

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Helsinki

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Helsinki

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Stockholm
Fujitsu World Tour 2015 Stockholm

 

 

 

 

 

 

What DO they have in common?

They are all stops on this year’s Fujitsu World Tour.  With only two weeks to go before the Melbourne event, we would like to share with you some footage from the events held so far. The Fujitsu World Tour 2015 started in Helsinki, Finland and then moved on to Stockholm, Sweden.

As you can see from the videos, we are setting up for a feature-packed program including international thought leaders, innovative technology delivering one of the region’s most comprehensive technology exhibitions.

The theme of this year’s event is Human Centric Innovation, which focuses on how technology can impact the way we live and work in an increasingly hyperconnected world.

If you are in any way responsible for contributing to your organisation’s ICT strategy, this conference will provide some valuable insight into what to expect over the next few years.  Our international thought leaders will present their insights on topics such as The Internet of Things and also give you a glimpse into The Future of ICT.

So if you are interested in finding out how ICT will impact the way we live and work, register now as there are limited places available for this exciting event.

Fujitsu World Tour 2015 is coming to Melbourne!

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Fujitsu today announces the 2015 Fujitsu World Tour international roadshow under the theme ‘Human Centric Innovation’ is coming to Melbourne on Thursday 28 May. With 10,000 expected visitors in 19 locations, Fujitsu World Tour is one of the largest world-wide ICT roadshows where Fujitsu demonstrates how businesses can continue to find innovative ways to leverage ICT in a world where the way we live and work is continually changing.

Fujitsu has assembled an extensive line-up of international and regional speakers to deliver thought-provoking keynotes and strategic perspectives into technology innovation. The compelling and content-rich program will provide insight into some of the hottest topics in the industry. Dr Joseph Reger, Chief Technology Officer, Global Delivery will present a keynote about driving innovation in how we work and live; Dr Alex Bazin, Head of Market and Technology Services at Fujitsu will provide an insight into emerging technologies and the Internet of Things; and David Gentle, Fujitsu’s Director of Foresight and Planning will provide a glimpse of what we can expect in the future of ICT.

Other topics to be delivered by leading technology vendors including Symantec, Intel, Citrix, Microsoft and Rocket Software include ‘Strategies to control risk while driving growth’, ‘Reshaping Enterprise Mobility’, ‘Modernisation Made Easy’ and ‘Technologies to Transform Business IT’. Local and international customers will also share their experiences in implementing innovative solutions with best practice ICT.

As part of the World Tour, Fujitsu will host one of the region’s most comprehensive technology exhibitions, with a look into its latest innovations in research and development. There will also be numerous opportunities throughout the day to network with other ICT and business leaders.

Mike Foster, Chief Executive Officer of Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand, said: “As a result of the positive feedback we received from our customers and the industry from last year’s event in Sydney, we have secured our place on this year’s program. As it is part of a multi-city event, the World Tour is an excellent opportunity to share Fujitsu’s global thought leadership and innovation with our customers and partners in this region. This snapshot into the future is a powerful and exciting opportunity for ICT strategists to get ahead of the cycle.”

To find out more information about this event please visit the Fujitsu World Tour 2015 website.

 

 

The digital forces reshaping business and society

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In this video from www.I-CIO.com, MIT’s Erik Brynjolfsson discusses how the ‘second machine age’ will surpass the Industrial Revolution in its impact on our lives and economies – with digital technology as the catalyst.

He compares the first Industrial Revolution – when humans removed the limitations of physical muscles and we first harnessed the steam engine – to the second machine age where new digital technologies – including cloud, big data and artificial intelligence are driving growth at exponential growth.

If you are interested in receiving throught leadership and insights from I-CIO on a regular basis please contact us on info@au.fujitsu.com

Towards the Agile Workplace

An interview with James Mercer, Solution Director for Virtual Client Services at Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand

What exactly do you mean by the term, ‘Agile Workplace’?

There are two aspects to agility in the workplace:

  • The agility of the workforce, and
  • The agility of the organisation in general

A truly agile workforce has the ability to access corporate systems and information from a variety of devices and locations. Access to corporate systems and data needs to be flexible enough to cater for employees varying work and life commitments. This typically means the ability to change devices and still be able to access corporate information at any time. We all find that the ideal device varies with what we are doing at the time. For example a mobile phone becomes our choice of device while travelling or between meetings. A tablet may be the choice at home, while the corporate PC or laptop is our chosen device when in the office. The key to agility in the workforce is to enable the same access regardless of the device that is being used at the time. 

An agile organisation needs to have the ability provide its workforce with the IT resources to meet its business needs at any point in time. This often means the ability to scale up and down in response to seasonal events. For example Christmas time is a big push for Retail organisations, while the end of the financial year is a big period for accountancy firms. An agile workplace must be able to scale ‘compute power’ up and down to meet the needs of users based on seasonal or unusual requirements. From a commercial point of view, consumption-based delivery models lend themselves better to this approach than traditional managed services models that rely on capacity to be forecast well in advance to accommodate all requirements – ultimately resulting in organisations paying for more capacity than they really need.

How are your customers embracing the concept? Do you see any patterns emerging?

We are seeing a lot of interest in Virtual Client Computing (which we brand Virtual Client Services (VCS)) – led by large enterprises. We are working with large organisations in transport, logistics, and financial services. We have had a lot of interest from all levels of government as well as support functions for government such as police forces. We are seeing this across Australia and New Zealand and I’m informed by my global counterparts that there is a significant demand worldwide.

The demand for VCS is definitely being led by large enterprises. It is clear that reducing costs is a major driver towards consumption-based services but there is also a clear requirement to be able to provide a more mobile experience for users.

There is a lot of talk about BYOD – does this approach have a place in the Agile Workplace and what challenges does this present for corporate IT departments?

 BYOD definitely plays a big part in the drive towards centralised computing, although many organisations are still struggling with the concept. What we will see is a change from managing devices to managing corporate applications and data. The technologies are becoming available to enable enterprises to manage applications and data regardless of the device. Currently there is still concern as corporates want to select and control devices but that mindset will change as the security around applications and data is improved through technologies such as the Citrix ‘Mobility Bundle’.

So do you think we are finally seeing the end of the PC in the corporate world?

We are still seeing good use cases particularly for people who work offline or who don’t have continuous access to communications infrastructure. People who travel a lot on trains or planes where the constant access to the network is not always guaranteed will still benefit from using a laptop. But for those who are always connected – whether it is by a telco data connection or Wi-Fi – remote desktops are fantastic. I can see that in a short time frame people will just go to work and log into a corporate device rather than carry their own laptop around. Alternatively PC’s and laptops may be replaced by lower cost devices such as Netbooks .When staff are away from the office users will be able to select the device or devices of their choice and access corporate systems securely – and all of these devices will have the ability to access to the same business applications and corporate data to allow the user to be productive. It will be less important to travel with a laptop and therefore promote more sustainable practices such as cycling or walking to work.

Of course there will always be a use case for people with specific needs to use a PC or laptop at work – for example high-end developers, and people who need access to bespoke systems, and legacy applications – so PCs will hang around for a while. But I think you will see a shift towards remote desktop computing with virtualised end-user services.

Is the Agile Workplace the domain of Gen Y? How will Baby Boomers adopt to this way of working?

Regardless of their generation, people will adopt a new approach to technology if they see value. The key for organisations to make the implementation of Virtual Client Services a success is to demonstrate to end users a superior service to the service they are currently using. Essentially we need to show people that there is no difference while they are in the office, but they have a much richer experience when they are out of the office. Our service provides a highly personalised, enterprise grade solution to ensure that users feel like they have been ‘upgraded’. Whereas traditionally people felt like they were being ‘downgraded’ by moving to a thin client.

What is the impact of Agile Working on corporate IT departments and what strategies do you recommend to make their lives easier?

In short, corporate IT are generally our biggest fans! A lot of headaches go away and it improves the agility of the organisation. It makes it easy for them to make changes and maintain policy. VCS has a significant impact on the corporate IT department and it is mainly all positive.

Firstly, computing is centralised so there is a much lower security risk than in a decentralised architecture. With a centralised approach it is also easier to encourage the use of best practices. For a large organisation it could mean the difference between having only a few hundred servers to manage as opposed to thousands  of Operating systems on PC’s- and most of the server images are copies of a Gold Build master – this makes managing VCS relatively simple to manage.

Software upgrades and adding new services is significantly easier. For example in the case of Microsoft Office instead of a gigabyte upgrade for each of several thousand PC’s the upgrade can be applied once and rolled out to the organisation almost immediately.

 

Ion Drives, Asteroid Mining and Artificial Intelligence – Science Fiction or Reality?

Sometimes we don’t realise how far we have really come in terms of technology. For example last year we celebrated the 20th anniversary of the first ever text message to a mobile phone (incidentally the message was “Merry Christmas”). Now we take text messages for granted in our personal and business lives, and text messaging as a technology is often seen as a technology nearing the end of its useful life. We’ve also seen the emergence of Twitter in a relatively short period to the point that it is now playing a role in crime fighting, and also being used extensively by public figures including The Pope!

A hundred years ago the mobile phone, let alone text messaging, would not have been dreamed of –  and now it is very much a part of our everyday life. It is interesting to speculate about what what we dream today becoming everyday life tomorrow. Science fiction writers do it all the time!

We live in a truly amazing time!

Much of what used to be thought of as science fiction has actually happened – but a lot of it is still to take place. In the past, the ideas and inspiration about what the future would look like came mostly from science fiction writers like Jules Verne, HG Wells, Mary Shelley, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Arthur C. Clarke, Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, George Orwell, E.E.’Doc’ Smith, Larry Niven and Robert Heinlein to name a few. They predicted or envisaged the following advances many decades or even a century before technology was capable of producing them:

  • Space Travel
  • Satellites
  • The Internet
  • Fax Machines
  • Nano Technology
  • Ubiquitous Video Communication
  • Mass Surveillance Systems
  • Supercomputers
  • Subsea Habitats and Exploration
  • Stealth Technology
  • Personal Area Networks
  • Cloud Computing

However, many predictions such as robots and artificial intelligence still have some way to go before they can match Asimov’s portrayal of robots or come anywhere even needing the 3 Laws of Robotics*, but we have recently seen advances that will potentially allow an AI to sit an entrance exam to Tokyo University. Continue reading

Customer Service Focus reaps rewards

Some time ago John Schumacher posted an article about Creating Customer Service from the Ground Up – Not just an afterthought, embed it into the culture. In his post he spoke about Fujitsu’s ROC programme, which is based on the principles of Responsiveness, Ownership and Communication.

Fujitsu wins Paragon Award for Innovation ExcellenceWe are pleased to say that this week Fujitsu was presented with the Service Provider Innovation Excellence Award at the ISG Awards in Sydney.  The Award was in recognition of the great work the Fujitsu Managed Services team has done with the ROC Programme. This continues a run of external recognition for this excellent programme including at the ITSMFA Awards, Customer Service Institute Awards and LearnX Awards.

 If you would like to find out more about the ROC programme, view this video.

A perspective on technology trends for 2013

At Fujitsu, we believe passionately that innovation in technology is our route to secure a better future. We have an ambitious vision; we call it Human Centric Intelligent Society. Human Centric Intelligent Society is about building a better, more sustainable society through the power of ICT. It means putting people at the heart of the world, and using technology to deliver innovation into everything we do. It means powering business and society with information and bringing together the physical and digital to deliver greater benefit across society. And it means orchestrating technology from end to end to deliver greater understanding and control of the world around us.

In line with this vision we are pleased to announce our new Technology Perspectives website. Technology Perspectives is a collection of articles that represent the views and experience of key people from Fujitsu around the world including myself. We look at the many different ways in which technology is shaping our world in 2013 across a broad range of topics. We investigate the continually evolving relationship between the business world and technology, and the opportunities that will arise.

There is a wealth of information in this resource and I encourage you to read it and to use it as a reference for strategy and planning. We will spend some time on this blog during the year exploring some of the topics in more detail.

I would be very interested in hearing your feedback on this resource – please send any feedback to me via the comment form below.