Getting smart with eWaste at Fujitsu

As part of our worldwide commitment to sustainability, Fujitsu takes a proactive approach to the collection and recycling of eWaste in our operations and community, and that’s a key priority for us. Our customers trust us to handle their eWaste and conduct thorough due diligence on their behalf. The correct handling of eWaste is important for many reasons:

  • Conserve natural resources and recover material for reuse. Around 95% of eWaste (by volume) can be recycled and reused.
  • Secure data destruction
  • Prevent environmental damage by ensuring potentially toxic materials are safely handled
  • Avoid eWaste ending up at an illegal eWaste dump – causing damage to human health & the environment, as well as brand damage if asset tagged or branded equipment is detected
  • Save money on the costs of operating, storing and disposing of end-of-life equipment
  • Compliance with legal and environmental obligations.  eWaste is banned from landfill in SA and a similar ban will be introduced in Victoria from 1 July 2019.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), otherwise known as the Global Goals, are a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity.  At Fujitsu, our vision is to use technology and innovation to create a “human centric intelligent society”, aligned with the efforts of the international community toward achieving the SDGs. Sustainable Development Goal 12: Responsible Consumption & Production calls on everyone to take actions to promote a circular economy, educating and assisting our value chain to minimise waste.

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Fujitsu ‘Digital Owl’ project trials drones and video analytics to identify threatened plant species

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Click to watch the video of Fujitsu’s Digital Owl initiative.

When our Sustainability consultants engage with a customer one of the questions they ask is ‘where does your main source of emissions come from?’ Surprisigly when working with a NSW Government Department, the answer was ‘Helicopter Jet Fuel’. This discussion led to a ‘co-creation’ project that has resulted in an innovative approach to identifying threatened species of plants in NSW bushland.

Fujitsu recently completed a successful trial to identify threatened plant species in New South Wales. Working with the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) ‘Saving our Species’ program, the ‘Digital Owl’ project uses Fujitsu’s high-performance computing, video analytics and drone technology to capture and analyse video information over a broad geographic area.

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The information can then be used to help locate endangered species for management, and invasive plant species for eradication purposes. The project was successfully trialed recently in remote bushland at Mount Dangar, NSW. The trial resulted in successful identification of the endangered plant species, Acacia dangarensis and Senecio linearifolius var. dangarensis, both of which are feared to be facing extinction, but were found growing in the wild.

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Senecio linearifolius var dangarensis – one of the threatened plant species that was successfully identified during the trial. (Photo credit: Lucas Grenadier)

In NSW alone there are approximately 1,000 plant and animal species under threat of extinction. Saving these species is crucial to the ongoing health of the various ecosystems in NSW. However, monitoring such a broad area can be prohibitively expensive, especially when considering the cost of chartering and fueling helicopters.

Drone technology with detailed layers of analytics behind them enables the collection of more accurate information including maps of otherwise inaccessible areas.

This project is aligned with Fujitsu’s vision of using technology to help provide sustainable outcomes for our customers and society.

Through an internally funded Co-creation project, Fujitsu identified the opportunity to apply advanced drone technology, combined with video analytics and spatial mapping technologies, to reduce the cost of monitoring and make the identification process more efficient.

This solution has the potential to improve the efficiency of identifying and locating particular plant species, which often requires exploring vast forest areas by helicopter. Use of the drone provides a significant saving in the cost of helicopter charter and fuel as well as a reduction in emissions.

Additionally, artificial intelligence (AI) technology is currently being trained to help identify species through video analysis. Fujitsu will continue to refine the technology by surveying the area at different altitudes to capture a richer base of data. Stage two of the project will employ SpatiOWL, Fujitsu’s big data enabled geospatial computing platform, to further enhance species geolocation. Fujitsu is exploring the application of this technology for a wide range of related purposes in Australia and New Zealand.

The technology can potentially be applied to identifying and locating outbreaks of noxious weeds in conservation areas and also identification of endangered birds and animals.

Fujitsu has commissioned a video overview of the initiative at the following link: Digital Owl video

Fujitsu marks the launch of our Reconciliation Action Plan

Fujitsu Australia recently marked an important step in its ongoing commitment to equity for Australian Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander people with the launch of its Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP).

The RAP is Fujitsu Australia’s 12 month plan to create sustainable opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander focusing on four key areas; relationships, respect, opportunities, tracking and progress.

The RAP seeks to:

  • Implement initiatives to assist the employment and opportunities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders
  • Increase Fujitsu Australia’s employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and Fujitsu’s use of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander suppliers in their supply chains, in the delivery of services; and
  • Improve the relationship, understanding and respect of Fujitsu Australia’s employees with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

Fujitsu Australia’s CEO Mike Foster hailed the launch of the RAP as an important milestone in Fujitsu’s diversity journey; “The ICT industry at large has been challenged by concerns around diversity and inclusion for some time. Fujitsu has taken a determined approach in acknowledging and adopting a series of initiatives to address these challenges within our industry. This Reconciliation Action Plan is a further commitment by Fujitsu to drive change not only within our own organisation, but within society.”

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Pictured above L-R: Fujitsu Australia CEO Mike Foster, Aunty Julie Janson Darug Elder, Jason Timor, Deputy CEO Supply Nation and Federal Member for Bennelong, John Alexander OAM.

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Fujitsu has been nominated for the Banksia Sustainability Awards 2017

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Fujitsu is proud to announce that the Australian #SMARTer2030 report has been nominated as a finalist in the Banksia Sustainability Awards for 2017. The awards are the longest running and most prestigious of Australia’s sustainability awards.

Written in partnership with Telstra, the #SMARTer2030 report has received accolades since its release late last year and is a nominee for the Banksia ‘Communication for Change Award’. This award recognises leadership and achievement in raising awareness and understanding of sustainability issues as well as promoting tangible change in values and behaviour that support a greater uptake of sustainable practices.

The report examines the 2015 Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI), SMARTer2030: ICT Solutions for 21st Century Challenges and puts these global opportunities into the Australian context. Our report reveals that if the technologies modelled were fully adopted, that ICT can potentially support the Australian Government to surpass its carbon reduction target.

The report features a range of case studies across a variety of industries that demonstrate how Fujitsu and Telstra are using a range of technologies to help customers to achieve business and environmental benefits.

Some of the key findings of the SMARTer2030 report include:

  • ICT provides significant environmental benefits such as increasing agricultural crop yields while reducing water and petrol use;
  • eWork can free up $AUD11.8 billion in capital expenditure through the reduced need for infrastructure;
  • eHealth can support 7 million people a year to engage with health practitioners remotely, in real time and on-demand

For more information and to download the report at the following link:

http://www.fujitsu.com/au/solutions/business-technology/sustainability-consulting/thought-leadership/smarter2030/index.html

Fujitsu wearables ensure the Belgian Solar Team’s well-being during Bridgestone World Solar Challenge

A team of Belgian University students will be looking to make history in the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge as they compete with 41 teams from around the world on an epic race across Australia. Fujitsu wearable technology will be used to monitor real-time vital signs and optimal balance of performance and well-being for the team.

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The challenge began in Darwin on Sunday 8th October, on a 3000-kilometre transcontinental journey to Adelaide. Starting at Darwin’s Hidden Valley Racetrack, the course is associated with V8 supercars rather than clean, solar-powered vehicles, however the Belgian team ‘Punch Powertrain’ had pole position in a time of 2:03.8 with an average speed of 83.4km/hr.

Winning pole position provides benefits to the team including not having to use stored energy to accelerate to overtake slower competitors. Whilst Punch Powertrain have never won the World Solar Challenge, it appears the team stand a good chance this year after their strong start.

The Fujitsu UBIQUITOUSWARE wearable solutions will measure driver well-being, including temperature, providing live telemetry to support crew. The solution will help the Belgian team to optimize cockpit cooling and ensure driver health during the race. As competitors cross the Australian outback where temperatures can hit up to 38 degrees Celsius, drivers must strike the right balance between using energy for air conditioning to cool the cockpit, or to power the vehicle.

The Punch Powertrain team comprising of 21 students from the University of Leuven in Belgium have been testing the Fujitsu wearables in the weeks leading up to the race to monitor driver heart rates, drowsiness levels, temperature and level of heat stress while they are on the move.

According to Jasper Schrijvers, a Punch Powertrain driver, “Driver fitness plays a crucial role in the World Solar Challenge, as it’s important that the driver doesn’t overheat at the wheel. We are planning to achieve speeds of up to 90km/h with the same amount of power that you use for a hairdryer. The use of any cooling will only slow us down and could mean the difference between winning and losing.”

James Maynard, Offering Management Director, IoT & Innovation, Innovative IoT Business Unit at Fujitsu says, “Fujitsu’s wearable solutions have enabled the Belgian team to provide previously unavailable insights into driver well-being, to see more, act faster and predict instead of react. The team used data collected during their preparation to advise their drivers on the optimum balance between performance and safety during the race.”

The event will reveal futuristic-looking solar powered cars, showcasing design that could one day lead to solar-powered cars for consumers that can carry passengers. We look forward to seeing the end result as the drivers finish the race 3000km’s later on October 15th in Adelaide!

Fujitsu’s sustainability internship provides new opportunities for international students

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The Fujitsu Australia & New Zealand Sustainability team is currently hosting two postgraduate interns from the Macquarie Graduate School of Management (MGSM).

Tuta Wamanga and Tinu Oshun recently joined Fujitsu on an intensive work placement as part of their Master of Business Administration course requirements. They are completing six months on exchange at Macquarie University before they’ll return to the University of Edinburgh in the UK to finish their MBA.

Over the last few years, previous MBA students from MGSM have worked across multiple sustainability projects; including examining the enabling factors for ICT Sustainability (which had input into Fujitsu Oceania’s sustainability benchmark model), feasibility of eWaste product takeback and brainstorming ideas to achieve our renewable energy target.

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Pictured above: The chart above reveals how Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand is tracking against targets, activities undertaken to reduce our footprint and what is still on the agenda.

”We always enjoy hosting the MGSM interns and get some business value from their time with us” said Lee Stewart, Head of Sustainability for Fujitsu Australia & New Zealand. “They bring a great blend of business experience and theoretical understanding, which they apply to create something of value to Fujitsu.  As a small team, having interns provides sustainability with not only assistance with some of our projects but also fresh perspectives and insights”.

At the 2017 Fujitsu World Tour we recently launched our Smart eWaste bin which uses IoT technology to assist customers to take the hassle out of ewaste.  For her project, Tinu will be working on a pricing model for our customers, enabling them to predict the costs of having a smart eWaste bin on their premises whilst still providing flexibility for Fujitsu. Drawing on more than a dozen years experience in the retail banking sector, Tinu will examine different approaches such as cost and value sharing, cost ceiling guarantees and provide a business case for adoption, as well as looking at external grants or funding rebates that customers could apply.

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Pictured above: Lee Stewart, Head of Sustainability for Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand explaining the benefits of the Smart eWaste bin at Fujitsu World Tour 2017.

“Working with Fujitsu has further enriched my MBA experience. I have been able to apply my financial background and quantitative methods of research gained in the course of my MBA to make meaningful contributions in developing a pricing model for the smart eWaste Bin. This project has in turn helped me identify sustainable business opportunities in the electronic waste industry,” says Tinu.

Tuta’s project will see the creation of an Indigenous Procurement Strategy for Fujitsu. As part of our commitment to Diversity & Inclusion the sustainability team is keen to explore how Fujitsu can provide Indigenous Australians with more opportunities to participate in the economy. Tuta has more than a decade’s experience in supply chain management in her home country of Kenya, including managing supply forecasting, procurement and management for an $80M business unit for Unilever East Africa. Included in Tuta’s project will be a survey of the competitive landscape for indigenous procurement and the specific opportunities to include indigenous suppliers in Fujitsu’s supply chain. This important project will create value for Fujitsu and the community while also helping Fujitsu to meet customer expectations, particularly in the Federal Government space.

“I feel privileged to be given a chance to work in a completely different industry and environment with the Fujitsu Sustainability team. This gives me the opportunity to not only contribute to a key component of the business by coming up with the indigenous procurement strategy, but also to gain key insights in the role business plays in creating a positive impact to society,” says Tuta.

Both Tuta and Tinu will be presenting the findings from their respective projects to key Fujitsu stakeholders before the end of their placement in August, after which they will return to Edinburgh to complete their MBA program. We wish them the best of luck as they continue their Fujitsu placement and their studies!

Australia to act SMARTer with Global e-Sustainability

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Fujitsu and Telstra recently launched the SMARTer2030 Report: Australian Opportunity for ICT Enabled Emission Reductions. Based on the Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI) SMARTer2030 report, the study shows that ICT can support the Australian Government to surpass its carbon reduction target.

Lee Stewart, Head of Sustainability in the Oceania region, was interviewed by GeSI about the report, what opportunities it revealed and what the next steps for Australia are.

He revealed that Smart Agriculture technologies are well positioned to help farmers build efficiency and resilience against a changing climate, safeguarding Australia’s $53 billion a year agricultural sector, as well as saving precious water resources.  He also addressed how ICT can deliver economic and social benefits by improving equity of access in education and healthcare to Australians in rural and remote communities.  Lee highlights the fact that Australia can meet its carbon reduction targets by 2030 – just with fully deploying ICT that exists right now.

Lee identified three key factors in unlocking the potential of ICT to deliver economic, social and environmental benefits, on the GeSI blog.

Watch the Sky News Smart Money interview below, with Lee Stewart and Brad Freeman (VP, Business and Application Services) as they discuss the findings from the SMARTer2030 report.

Article by Blaise Porter – Fujitsu Sustainability Manager

 

 

Sustainability: The business imperative. Interview with Alison Rowe.

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Summary of article featured in I-CIO

In this interview, Alison Rowe, global executive director sustainability at Fujitsu, talks to I-CIO.com about the leadership approaches and technology investments required to make sustainability part of the corporate DNA.

Alison expresses her view that sustainability is integral to a business – not a separate element and that ICT has the capacity to “help build a safer, more prosperous and sustainable society, where knowledge is continually harnessed and people are empowered to innovate. We call this vision a Human Centric Intelligent Society.”

For global organisations, such as Fujitsu, Alison offers practical insight; “At Fujitsu, we have a global sustainability board that brings different parts of Fujitsu together to look at the business plan and understand the different market drivers across our geographies. That diversity of approach works providing there’s common alignment in what we’re doing, what it means, the language we’re using and how we report it.”

Read the complete article here.

Environmental benefits of desktop virtual computing

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The rise and uptake of the virtual desktop has enabled organisations to realise a number of benefits including improved user experience, better customer service and up to a 40% reduction in desktop support costs. Not to mention the ability for organisations to move from a CAPEX operating model to a more OPEX utility based platform.

Given the increases in services and solutions to date very little information has been made available about the sustainability and environmental benefit of a virtual desktop solution. With the rise in energy costs and environmental compliance the total environmental benefits of a virtual desktop solution have been to date undervalued.

Fujitsu has published a white paper that discusses the closely linked subjects of energy use and carbon emissions around the desktop environment. It looks at the potential decreased energy costs of deploying a virtual desktop solution based on Fujitsu Virtual Client Services (VCS), but also delves deeper into other tangible and intangible benefits such as more efficient maintenance, longer refresh cycles of desktop hardware, decreased heat load in buildings, ability to sweat assets longer and the potential reduced embodied carbon and emissions throughout the lifecycle of a virtual desktop. Continue reading

Fujitsu Rainforest Regeneration Project plants over 1,000 trees in Borneo Rainforest

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Our local Head of Sustainability, Lee Stewart, spent last week in the Borneo jungle planting over 1,000 trees as part of Fujitsu’s Rainforest Regeneration Project….
 
Last week I was fortunate to be one of five Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand staff who spent four days in the Borneo Jungle taking part in the Fujitsu Rainforest Regeneration Project.  Under testing conditions of 35+ degree heat with 70% humidity the team along with 50 other Fujitsu staff from over 8 different countries took part in numerous activities including measuring bio diversity, determining tree growth, maintenance and also planting seedlings.Rainforests are an extremely important part of our eco system they are responsible for around 40% of the world’s oxygen turnover. They are also nicknamed the world’s pharmacy as over a quarter of the world’s natural medicines have been discovered there. What is really amazing is that scientists still think that there may be millions of species of plants and insects that are yet to be discovered which may hold also the key to many medical cures.Lead by Fujitsu Japan the relationship with the local park in Borneo dates back over ten years and is a regular calendar event where Fujitsu staff work in collaboration with locals.  As a direct result of the work done by Fujitsu staff over the years the park now has over 39,000 new native trees.