Fujitsu wearables ensure the Belgian Solar Team’s well-being during Bridgestone World Solar Challenge

A team of Belgian University students will be looking to make history in the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge as they compete with 41 teams from around the world on an epic race across Australia. Fujitsu wearable technology will be used to monitor real-time vital signs and optimal balance of performance and well-being for the team.

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The challenge began in Darwin on Sunday 8th October, on a 3000-kilometre transcontinental journey to Adelaide. Starting at Darwin’s Hidden Valley Racetrack, the course is associated with V8 supercars rather than clean, solar-powered vehicles, however the Belgian team ‘Punch Powertrain’ had pole position in a time of 2:03.8 with an average speed of 83.4km/hr.

Winning pole position provides benefits to the team including not having to use stored energy to accelerate to overtake slower competitors. Whilst Punch Powertrain have never won the World Solar Challenge, it appears the team stand a good chance this year after their strong start.

The Fujitsu UBIQUITOUSWARE wearable solutions will measure driver well-being, including temperature, providing live telemetry to support crew. The solution will help the Belgian team to optimize cockpit cooling and ensure driver health during the race. As competitors cross the Australian outback where temperatures can hit up to 38 degrees Celsius, drivers must strike the right balance between using energy for air conditioning to cool the cockpit, or to power the vehicle.

The Punch Powertrain team comprising of 21 students from the University of Leuven in Belgium have been testing the Fujitsu wearables in the weeks leading up to the race to monitor driver heart rates, drowsiness levels, temperature and level of heat stress while they are on the move.

According to Jasper Schrijvers, a Punch Powertrain driver, “Driver fitness plays a crucial role in the World Solar Challenge, as it’s important that the driver doesn’t overheat at the wheel. We are planning to achieve speeds of up to 90km/h with the same amount of power that you use for a hairdryer. The use of any cooling will only slow us down and could mean the difference between winning and losing.”

James Maynard, Offering Management Director, IoT & Innovation, Innovative IoT Business Unit at Fujitsu says, “Fujitsu’s wearable solutions have enabled the Belgian team to provide previously unavailable insights into driver well-being, to see more, act faster and predict instead of react. The team used data collected during their preparation to advise their drivers on the optimum balance between performance and safety during the race.”

The event will reveal futuristic-looking solar powered cars, showcasing design that could one day lead to solar-powered cars for consumers that can carry passengers. We look forward to seeing the end result as the drivers finish the race 3000km’s later on October 15th in Adelaide!

Fujitsu’s sustainability internship provides new opportunities for international students

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The Fujitsu Australia & New Zealand Sustainability team is currently hosting two postgraduate interns from the Macquarie Graduate School of Management (MGSM).

Tuta Wamanga and Tinu Oshun recently joined Fujitsu on an intensive work placement as part of their Master of Business Administration course requirements. They are completing six months on exchange at Macquarie University before they’ll return to the University of Edinburgh in the UK to finish their MBA.

Over the last few years, previous MBA students from MGSM have worked across multiple sustainability projects; including examining the enabling factors for ICT Sustainability (which had input into Fujitsu Oceania’s sustainability benchmark model), feasibility of eWaste product takeback and brainstorming ideas to achieve our renewable energy target.

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Pictured above: The chart above reveals how Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand is tracking against targets, activities undertaken to reduce our footprint and what is still on the agenda.

”We always enjoy hosting the MGSM interns and get some business value from their time with us” said Lee Stewart, Head of Sustainability for Fujitsu Australia & New Zealand. “They bring a great blend of business experience and theoretical understanding, which they apply to create something of value to Fujitsu.  As a small team, having interns provides sustainability with not only assistance with some of our projects but also fresh perspectives and insights”.

At the 2017 Fujitsu World Tour we recently launched our Smart eWaste bin which uses IoT technology to assist customers to take the hassle out of ewaste.  For her project, Tinu will be working on a pricing model for our customers, enabling them to predict the costs of having a smart eWaste bin on their premises whilst still providing flexibility for Fujitsu. Drawing on more than a dozen years experience in the retail banking sector, Tinu will examine different approaches such as cost and value sharing, cost ceiling guarantees and provide a business case for adoption, as well as looking at external grants or funding rebates that customers could apply.

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Pictured above: Lee Stewart, Head of Sustainability for Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand explaining the benefits of the Smart eWaste bin at Fujitsu World Tour 2017.

“Working with Fujitsu has further enriched my MBA experience. I have been able to apply my financial background and quantitative methods of research gained in the course of my MBA to make meaningful contributions in developing a pricing model for the smart eWaste Bin. This project has in turn helped me identify sustainable business opportunities in the electronic waste industry,” says Tinu.

Tuta’s project will see the creation of an Indigenous Procurement Strategy for Fujitsu. As part of our commitment to Diversity & Inclusion the sustainability team is keen to explore how Fujitsu can provide Indigenous Australians with more opportunities to participate in the economy. Tuta has more than a decade’s experience in supply chain management in her home country of Kenya, including managing supply forecasting, procurement and management for an $80M business unit for Unilever East Africa. Included in Tuta’s project will be a survey of the competitive landscape for indigenous procurement and the specific opportunities to include indigenous suppliers in Fujitsu’s supply chain. This important project will create value for Fujitsu and the community while also helping Fujitsu to meet customer expectations, particularly in the Federal Government space.

“I feel privileged to be given a chance to work in a completely different industry and environment with the Fujitsu Sustainability team. This gives me the opportunity to not only contribute to a key component of the business by coming up with the indigenous procurement strategy, but also to gain key insights in the role business plays in creating a positive impact to society,” says Tuta.

Both Tuta and Tinu will be presenting the findings from their respective projects to key Fujitsu stakeholders before the end of their placement in August, after which they will return to Edinburgh to complete their MBA program. We wish them the best of luck as they continue their Fujitsu placement and their studies!

Australia to act SMARTer with Global e-Sustainability

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Fujitsu and Telstra recently launched the SMARTer2030 Report: Australian Opportunity for ICT Enabled Emission Reductions. Based on the Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI) SMARTer2030 report, the study shows that ICT can support the Australian Government to surpass its carbon reduction target.

Lee Stewart, Head of Sustainability in the Oceania region, was interviewed by GeSI about the report, what opportunities it revealed and what the next steps for Australia are.

He revealed that Smart Agriculture technologies are well positioned to help farmers build efficiency and resilience against a changing climate, safeguarding Australia’s $53 billion a year agricultural sector, as well as saving precious water resources.  He also addressed how ICT can deliver economic and social benefits by improving equity of access in education and healthcare to Australians in rural and remote communities.  Lee highlights the fact that Australia can meet its carbon reduction targets by 2030 – just with fully deploying ICT that exists right now.

Lee identified three key factors in unlocking the potential of ICT to deliver economic, social and environmental benefits, on the GeSI blog.

Watch the Sky News Smart Money interview below, with Lee Stewart and Brad Freeman (VP, Business and Application Services) as they discuss the findings from the SMARTer2030 report.

Article by Blaise Porter – Fujitsu Sustainability Manager

 

 

Sustainability: The business imperative. Interview with Alison Rowe.

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Summary of article featured in I-CIO

In this interview, Alison Rowe, global executive director sustainability at Fujitsu, talks to I-CIO.com about the leadership approaches and technology investments required to make sustainability part of the corporate DNA.

Alison expresses her view that sustainability is integral to a business – not a separate element and that ICT has the capacity to “help build a safer, more prosperous and sustainable society, where knowledge is continually harnessed and people are empowered to innovate. We call this vision a Human Centric Intelligent Society.”

For global organisations, such as Fujitsu, Alison offers practical insight; “At Fujitsu, we have a global sustainability board that brings different parts of Fujitsu together to look at the business plan and understand the different market drivers across our geographies. That diversity of approach works providing there’s common alignment in what we’re doing, what it means, the language we’re using and how we report it.”

Read the complete article here.

Environmental benefits of desktop virtual computing

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The rise and uptake of the virtual desktop has enabled organisations to realise a number of benefits including improved user experience, better customer service and up to a 40% reduction in desktop support costs. Not to mention the ability for organisations to move from a CAPEX operating model to a more OPEX utility based platform.

Given the increases in services and solutions to date very little information has been made available about the sustainability and environmental benefit of a virtual desktop solution. With the rise in energy costs and environmental compliance the total environmental benefits of a virtual desktop solution have been to date undervalued.

Fujitsu has published a white paper that discusses the closely linked subjects of energy use and carbon emissions around the desktop environment. It looks at the potential decreased energy costs of deploying a virtual desktop solution based on Fujitsu Virtual Client Services (VCS), but also delves deeper into other tangible and intangible benefits such as more efficient maintenance, longer refresh cycles of desktop hardware, decreased heat load in buildings, ability to sweat assets longer and the potential reduced embodied carbon and emissions throughout the lifecycle of a virtual desktop. Continue reading

Fujitsu Rainforest Regeneration Project plants over 1,000 trees in Borneo Rainforest

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Our local Head of Sustainability, Lee Stewart, spent last week in the Borneo jungle planting over 1,000 trees as part of Fujitsu’s Rainforest Regeneration Project….
 
Last week I was fortunate to be one of five Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand staff who spent four days in the Borneo Jungle taking part in the Fujitsu Rainforest Regeneration Project.  Under testing conditions of 35+ degree heat with 70% humidity the team along with 50 other Fujitsu staff from over 8 different countries took part in numerous activities including measuring bio diversity, determining tree growth, maintenance and also planting seedlings.Rainforests are an extremely important part of our eco system they are responsible for around 40% of the world’s oxygen turnover. They are also nicknamed the world’s pharmacy as over a quarter of the world’s natural medicines have been discovered there. What is really amazing is that scientists still think that there may be millions of species of plants and insects that are yet to be discovered which may hold also the key to many medical cures.Lead by Fujitsu Japan the relationship with the local park in Borneo dates back over ten years and is a regular calendar event where Fujitsu staff work in collaboration with locals.  As a direct result of the work done by Fujitsu staff over the years the park now has over 39,000 new native trees.

How sustainable is ICT?

Fujitsu launched its third global benchmark report today into ICT sustainability maturity. This is a fantastic body of research that allows us to see how sustainability is progressing broadly within ICT departments, in different countries and in different industries.

The report tells us that there are challenges out there; overall Australia’s sustainability maturity is heading backwards. Why? That’s a good question and I’d be really interested to hear peoples thoughts on that. I think my top three would be:

  1. Hype is over: we had a lot of noise about “Green”. Everything and everyone was green for a while back there, even IT departments. Then we’ve learnt that it’s not quite as easy as first thought, projects need to be bedded in and maintained, they have to be part of a change program and can’t just be achieved as a tick in the box exercise.
  2.  ICT departments don’t align their strategy with the broader organisation sustainability strategy. So increased sustainability maturity is a by-product from projects and programs that they are looking to do anyway. This means we miss the opportunity to get maximum value from these projects.
  3. ICT departments are still not accountable for the power bill; while this year’s benchmark report shows that while this is improving, the majority of organisations don’t have visibility of their power bill and are not accountable for energy spend. The stats show that improvement in this metric is closely linked to better overall performance in other areas. So this one is key.

You can find the full report here

Challenges are, as we know, also opportunities. In a time of rising electricity costs, ICT departments can make a contribution to both the bottom line of the organisation as well as to its environmental performance. The Global Benchmark Report shows that many organisations today are achieving best practice and are already reaping the rewards.