7 Must-Knows When Considering a Data Centre Solution

Aampliy_Blog_PRIMERGYInformation and communications technology downtime and delays are on average costing businesses $9000 per minute ($540,000 per hour) according to the Ponemon Institute. The financial services sector took top honours with nearly a million dollars in costs per outage.

But it’s not all bad news.

The cost of fixing the problem is relatively small, as a little investment in increasing the reliability of ICT will provide ROI by reducing productivity and revenue losses – and Investment in the Australian data centre services market is predicted to grow at a CAGR of 12.4% in the next 5 years.

This is essential in today’s fast world of big data which is leaving old ICT systems further and further behind. With Australian enterprises putting an increasing focus on scalability, standards, and security, legacy systems just don’t cut it. Combine this with the fact that companies are lacking the expert knowledge and services to keep up with swift IT advances and you have a landscape full of laggards, not leaders.

As such, one of the most challenging aspects faced by the CIOs is how to keep their IT strategy aligned with the business strategy, and their aged data centres upgraded and running with efficiency.

Improving overall data centre functionality and performance calls for modernising your existing data centre through the latest technologies, infrastructure and services. A data centre which is highly responsive, agile and sustainable, reduces operational costs, risk and is future proofed for expansion.

Your data centre has the potential to drive your business forward and help you be a leader in this fast-paced world. Here are our top 7 must-knows when considering a data centre solution:

  1. Scalability

One of the major benefits you can bring to your business with a robust data centre solution is the ability to add data storage capacity to meet your emerging business requirements.  This means you pay only for the capacity you need, knowing that you can easily scale to meet increasing data volume demands.

  1. Security

Maintaining the confidentiality, integrity and availability of information is critical to the success of your organisation. Place your information in a facility that offers state-of-the-art digital surveillance and security equipment for prevention of unauthorised access. Consider measures, such as biometric access points, 24-hour on-site security controls, integrated access management and CCTV systems.

  1. Reliability & High Availability

Reliability and high availability are not the same. For example, a reliable system that takes a long time to fix if something fails does not have high availability. Data centres that have both are those that are engineered to international standards of excellence ensuring appropriate controls are in place.

Keep these key national standards for data centre facilities in mind when looking at your options:

  • Information Security Management Systems (ISMS) ISO 27001
  • Government Security Standards
  • Environmental Management System ISO 14001
  • ITIL IT Service Management
  • ISO 9001 Quality System
  1. Energy Efficiency

Having reliable and high-performance computing power is a crucial aspect of running your business effectively and competitively. It is also highly energy intensive. In Australia, the NABERS Energy rating for data centres can help CIOs, IT Managers and tenants assess energy performance for an outsourced data centre reliably and as a comparison point with other data centres within Australia.

This provides a way for data centre energy efficiency to be externally validated against a standard by an independent government assessor.

  1. Services

Choose a flexible provider who can offer professional expertise, support and services as your business and circumstance change, including:

  • Co-location services
  • Add-on services – On-site services, such as remote hands and media management
  • Project services – Relocation, installation and consolidation from your premises or third party location into a managed data centre
  • Managed services – End-to-end delivery of services and support.
  1. Servers

Servers are the big users of energy in a data centre which is why you achieve greater efficiency by running those that consume less power but still provide best-in-class performance. Your data centre provider can run theirs, or you can supply your own for use in a facility, but it’s critical to opt for servers which will allow you to deliver at the speed your enterprise demands. Bookmark this reference to Fujitsu PRIMERGY servers as a good starting point.

  1. Location

If you’re considering a co-location data centre solution, the location of the facility (or facilities) you will use is an integral factor. If someone from your company will be upgrading or servicing your equipment when needed, you need easy access to this location. Another aspect to keep in mind when assessing locations is to investigate the likelihood of natural disasters and what redundancy operations are in place.

Keep pace with the world moving at a digital speed and be the leader, not the laggard. Fast track your data centre modernisation by understanding the key transformation factors.

infographic

 

How to address the burning question “will my data be secure in the Cloud?”

Cloud computing is transforming the way IT-based services are delivered to organisations. There are many clear advantages of moving to ‘the cloud’ – reduced capital expenditure, scalability and increased business agility to name a few.

For most organisations, therefore, the journey to cloud is no longer a question of ‘if’ but rather ‘when’, and a large number of enterprises have already travelled some way down this path.

Will my data be secure if I put it in the Cloud?

However, there is one overwhelming question that is still causing many CIOs and their colleagues to delay their move to cloud: ‘Will my data be secure if I put it in the Cloud?’

This question has been the subject of much media attention and expert debate including this recent article in SMH ITPro. Essentially there are too many factors to consider to make a general statement. Organisations need to consider what application will be used, the sensitivity of the information, and above all the credentials of the cloud services provider.

Security in relation to cloud should be treated the same as security in any major IT decision, with the correct checks and balances to ensure all necessary security and risk management measures are covered.

Businesses that are already deep into their cloud programmes are reporting that security, while an extremely important consideration, is not a barrier to adoption.
If you are interested in exploring this topic further, Fujitsu has published a very comprehensive white paper on the issues surrounding Cloud security and how Fujitsu deals with these. It can be downloaded from the following link: The White Book of Cloud Security