Demystifying ‘Fast IT’

As the pace of business changes at an ever-increasing rate, there are increasing demands on IT systems to support continual change. From an IT perspective we need to be ‘on the front foot’ to anticipate the needs of the business. One of the terms we will hear more regularly is that of ‘Fast IT’. We caught up with two of our leading architects, Ramy Ibrahim and Charles Ponniah to get a further insight into the concept of Fast IT and how organisations can embrace it.

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From Left: Ramy Ibrahim, Charles Ponniah.

Can you explain what FAST IT is?

Ramy: Fast IT is a relatively new term. It’s about the new way of delivering IT services. It is a way of thinking that will enable rapid innovation in a business. It’s about providing that experience that consumers traditionally get, that corporate IT departments always seem to slow down.

Why is it important to move to Fast IT?

Ramy: It is about the user experience. If the user experience isn’t up to the standards that users expect, they will find a way around it. The key thing is making sure you meet the internal metrics such as security governance and delivery method, but also ensuring that it delivers a good user experience.

Charles: It is also about enablement. At Fujitsu, our focus is on getting people onto the technology faster to enable them to produce things in a more creative or faster way.

How do organisations stand to benefit from adopting Fast IT?

Charles It is all about unleashing ability, efficiency, productivity and creativity. It is about having the ability and capabilities to outpace your competition. Late last year we conducted a “Hackathon” with our employees from across Australia and New Zealand. As a result of this concentrated effort over two days we identified a number of viable products that we could look to commercialise. This is a great example of how organisations can benefit from this approach rather than the traditional models of development. Continue reading

Australia to act SMARTer with Global e-Sustainability

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Fujitsu and Telstra recently launched the SMARTer2030 Report: Australian Opportunity for ICT Enabled Emission Reductions. Based on the Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI) SMARTer2030 report, the study shows that ICT can support the Australian Government to surpass its carbon reduction target.

Lee Stewart, Head of Sustainability in the Oceania region, was interviewed by GeSI about the report, what opportunities it revealed and what the next steps for Australia are.

He revealed that Smart Agriculture technologies are well positioned to help farmers build efficiency and resilience against a changing climate, safeguarding Australia’s $53 billion a year agricultural sector, as well as saving precious water resources.  He also addressed how ICT can deliver economic and social benefits by improving equity of access in education and healthcare to Australians in rural and remote communities.  Lee highlights the fact that Australia can meet its carbon reduction targets by 2030 – just with fully deploying ICT that exists right now.

Lee identified three key factors in unlocking the potential of ICT to deliver economic, social and environmental benefits, on the GeSI blog.

Watch the Sky News Smart Money interview below, with Lee Stewart and Brad Freeman (VP, Business and Application Services) as they discuss the findings from the SMARTer2030 report.

Article by Blaise Porter – Fujitsu Sustainability Manager