Fujitsu has been nominated for the Banksia Sustainability Awards 2017

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Fujitsu is proud to announce that the Australian #SMARTer2030 report has been nominated as a finalist in the Banksia Sustainability Awards for 2017. The awards are the longest running and most prestigious of Australia’s sustainability awards.

Written in partnership with Telstra, the #SMARTer2030 report has received accolades since its release late last year and is a nominee for the Banksia ‘Communication for Change Award’. This award recognises leadership and achievement in raising awareness and understanding of sustainability issues as well as promoting tangible change in values and behaviour that support a greater uptake of sustainable practices.

The report examines the 2015 Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI), SMARTer2030: ICT Solutions for 21st Century Challenges and puts these global opportunities into the Australian context. Our report reveals that if the technologies modelled were fully adopted, that ICT can potentially support the Australian Government to surpass its carbon reduction target.

The report features a range of case studies across a variety of industries that demonstrate how Fujitsu and Telstra are using a range of technologies to help customers to achieve business and environmental benefits.

Some of the key findings of the SMARTer2030 report include:

  • ICT provides significant environmental benefits such as increasing agricultural crop yields while reducing water and petrol use;
  • eWork can free up $AUD11.8 billion in capital expenditure through the reduced need for infrastructure;
  • eHealth can support 7 million people a year to engage with health practitioners remotely, in real time and on-demand

For more information and to download the report at the following link:

http://www.fujitsu.com/au/solutions/business-technology/sustainability-consulting/thought-leadership/smarter2030/index.html

Fujitsu wearables ensure the Belgian Solar Team’s well-being during Bridgestone World Solar Challenge

A team of Belgian University students will be looking to make history in the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge as they compete with 41 teams from around the world on an epic race across Australia. Fujitsu wearable technology will be used to monitor real-time vital signs and optimal balance of performance and well-being for the team.

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The challenge began in Darwin on Sunday 8th October, on a 3000-kilometre transcontinental journey to Adelaide. Starting at Darwin’s Hidden Valley Racetrack, the course is associated with V8 supercars rather than clean, solar-powered vehicles, however the Belgian team ‘Punch Powertrain’ had pole position in a time of 2:03.8 with an average speed of 83.4km/hr.

Winning pole position provides benefits to the team including not having to use stored energy to accelerate to overtake slower competitors. Whilst Punch Powertrain have never won the World Solar Challenge, it appears the team stand a good chance this year after their strong start.

The Fujitsu UBIQUITOUSWARE wearable solutions will measure driver well-being, including temperature, providing live telemetry to support crew. The solution will help the Belgian team to optimize cockpit cooling and ensure driver health during the race. As competitors cross the Australian outback where temperatures can hit up to 38 degrees Celsius, drivers must strike the right balance between using energy for air conditioning to cool the cockpit, or to power the vehicle.

The Punch Powertrain team comprising of 21 students from the University of Leuven in Belgium have been testing the Fujitsu wearables in the weeks leading up to the race to monitor driver heart rates, drowsiness levels, temperature and level of heat stress while they are on the move.

According to Jasper Schrijvers, a Punch Powertrain driver, “Driver fitness plays a crucial role in the World Solar Challenge, as it’s important that the driver doesn’t overheat at the wheel. We are planning to achieve speeds of up to 90km/h with the same amount of power that you use for a hairdryer. The use of any cooling will only slow us down and could mean the difference between winning and losing.”

James Maynard, Offering Management Director, IoT & Innovation, Innovative IoT Business Unit at Fujitsu says, “Fujitsu’s wearable solutions have enabled the Belgian team to provide previously unavailable insights into driver well-being, to see more, act faster and predict instead of react. The team used data collected during their preparation to advise their drivers on the optimum balance between performance and safety during the race.”

The event will reveal futuristic-looking solar powered cars, showcasing design that could one day lead to solar-powered cars for consumers that can carry passengers. We look forward to seeing the end result as the drivers finish the race 3000km’s later on October 15th in Adelaide!

Workplace 2025: Take a glimpse into the five biggest changes we’re about to see in the workplace

In the latest Future Workplace 2025 blog, Ramanan Ramakrishna, Head of MIS Service Innovation and Portfolio EMEIA explains the five biggest changes we’re about to see in the workplace. Read more from the digital workplace global blog below.

The year 2025 might seem a long way off, but the sheer scale of workplace transformation we’re going to see between now and then means you need to start preparing right now if you don’t want to be left behind in the future.

A new whitepaper called Workplace 2025 has recently been released, designed to offer guidance and practical steps you can take to ensure your business sees long term success.

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In this article, Ramanan describes the five major developments we’ll see in the coming years, and the building blocks needed to ensure you’re ready for what’s ahead.

These five developments are:

  1. The lifestyle workplace (social change)
  2. The intelligent workplace (technological change)
  3. The low-impact workplace (business and industry change)
  4. The boundary-less workplace (business and industry change)
  5. The cross-generational workplace (demographic change)

But what do these mean in a little more detail?

1. The lifestyle workplace

For years we took the nine-to-five office job as a given. You go to work, do your hours, go home again. Five days a week like clockwork. By 2025 this concept will have faded into history, as will the idea of spending your whole life in the same profession. The stability workers once sought will be replaced by flexibility, with more people opting for freelance contracts than ever before. No longer will people be bound to one company or even one geographical location. The physical nature of the office will change too, to favour health and wellness, while wearable technology will help employees manage workloads and stress levels. Most importantly, however, the employee experience will become the benchmark of a successful workplace. More holistic in approach than the user experience we talk about today, the aim will be to achieve an integrated view of everything that impacts an employee’s working life – from on-boarding and training to performance and wellness.

2. The intelligent workplace

Of course, many (if not most) of the changes we’ll see in the workplace by 2025 will be driven by technology. Or at least enabled by it. Soon technology will be embedded into every aspect of our working lives. We’ll see artificial intelligence (AI)-powered automation completely reshape the way we do business. Certain human roles will become less necessary, while many new ones will be created. Intelligent assistants will do the painful jobs so we don’t have to. And with less time spent on arduous admin tasks, the majority of us will be free to focus on bigger and better thinking. And through advancements in AI and biometric technology, cyber-security will evolve to the point where it becomes non-intrusive – authenticating our movements at every stage of our working day without us even knowing it’s happening.

3. The low-impact workplace

These advances in workplace technology will impact something bigger than ourselves, of course: the state of our planet’s environment. There will be little need to be in a specific location to collaborate and be productive. Virtual meetings will replace face-to-face ones, and tools like virtual reality will help keep communication engaging. With fewer people commuting to the office as a result (and certainly not at the same time), the workforce’s overall carbon footprint will dramatically reduce. Couple that with smart buildings helping companies use energy more efficiently and you can see what a huge impact workplace technology will have on the wider environment.

4. The boundary-less workplace

The days of companies operating in isolation are already on their way out. By 2025 they will be long gone. In future we’ll see much more open collaboration across industries. Brands will increasingly look beyond their own walls in order to innovate, perhaps even co-creating with those they once called competitors. We’ll see much more of a global talent pool, with firms reaching across the world to crowd-source skills they need, regardless of location. Frankly, most companies simply won’t exist in their current form by 2025. To survive, a much more fluid approach to business will be necessary.

5. The cross-generational workplace

Finally, the demographic makeup of the workforce will evolve beyond recognition by 2025. Never will so many generations have been in one workplace simultaneously. Generations Y and Z will be more prevalent, and corporate culture will transform around their needs and working styles. But on the other end of the scale, a large number people will be working into their late 60s or even 70s, and companies are going to have to find a way to meet the needs of younger workers without alienating these older employees. Technology like augmented reality will help the older generation transfer their skills and knowledge to younger colleagues without the need to be in the same place.

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The workplace is transforming in ways we couldn’t previously have imagined, and the opportunities for improved productivity and efficiency are virtually limitless.

But there are risks here, for those organisations that don’t adapt quickly enough.

To avoid being one of them, there are five essential building blocks you need to start putting in place today:

  1.  Employee freedom: blurring the line between the enterprise employee and consumer, or removing it altogether.
  2. Compliancy without revoking freedom: a few years ago corporates were banning Facebook; now they’re encouraging its use. You need to find the balance between remaining compliant and providing freedom and flexibility.
  3.  Intelligent use of data: you need to capture every piece of data out there and then tie the whole map together to make sense of it.
  4. Harnessing wearables: wearable technology in the workplace is about to go mainstream. You need to work out what it means for your business and how to get the most out of it.
  5.  Deskilling: This is called ‘knowledge acquisition’ or ‘transparent knowledge acquisition’, i.e. you may not know you’re giving away knowledge, but you are. This is going to become hugely important as the workplace structure and demographic evolves.

None of us can truly know exactly what lies ahead, but if you follow the above steps you’ll at least be in a better position to face whatever is coming. To not only survive this transformation, but thrive in it.

And there are risks in not preparing…

You don’t want to be the company that ends up acquiring too much traditional talent at a time when a new approach is needed. And you certainly don’t want to adopt too little data and drop behind in terms of the insights you’re able to derive, or falling foul of new regulations because you haven’t adapted your security strategy in time.

2025 is almost a decade away but according to Ramanan, you really do need to be thinking that far ahead. Any action you take now is going to be much less costly and disruptive than inaction will be in the long run.

Keep an eye out for more content over the coming months as these issues are explored in greater detail across our blog and Fujitsu social channels.

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Fujitsu’s Women at Work – insights into flexible working

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In Fujitsu’s efforts to support equal opportunity and make flexible work part of our company’s DNA, this latest blog post features three Fujitsu women, highlighting their experiences with flexible working arrangements after returning to work from maternity leave.

For Jillian Bungate being out of the workforce for 10 years as a stay at home mum made it incredibly difficult to re-apply for a job. Looking at junior roles and lacking confidence, she was grateful for the day she vented to a fellow mum who happened to work at Fujitsu. With a new role on offer that matched Jillian’s work history and studies, she willingly applied and threw herself into a full time role.

“With a husband that works a job with lots of travel, juggling online studies and two kids that never knew life with a working mum, my decision to go full time led to a crazy house, upset kids and an unhealthy lifestyle for my family. I worried over how to manage the situation thinking I’d have to resign only 8 weeks in to my grand return to work! But my manager reassured me we could make a plan to reduce my work hours as well as offering me the flexibility around when I worked those hours,” says Jillian.

Chiara Charlton experienced a similar process after having been with Fujitsu for 5 years before leaving for maternity leave. While she applied for 11 months of leave, Chiara returned to Fujitsu after 9 months off, returning four days per week initially and then increasing to five days. Chiara found the return to work very easy and was in regular contact with her new manager and other team members running the team while she was away.

“There had been an organisational change during my maternity leave and although my role stayed the same, my team and reporting structure had changed. However I was kept up to date in the months leading up to my return to work and my team were very supportive of my plans. Over the last 2 years my manager has been very accommodating if I have needed to flex my hours to care for my young daughter,” Chiara explains.

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Fujitsu’s sustainability internship provides new opportunities for international students

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The Fujitsu Australia & New Zealand Sustainability team is currently hosting two postgraduate interns from the Macquarie Graduate School of Management (MGSM).

Tuta Wamanga and Tinu Oshun recently joined Fujitsu on an intensive work placement as part of their Master of Business Administration course requirements. They are completing six months on exchange at Macquarie University before they’ll return to the University of Edinburgh in the UK to finish their MBA.

Over the last few years, previous MBA students from MGSM have worked across multiple sustainability projects; including examining the enabling factors for ICT Sustainability (which had input into Fujitsu Oceania’s sustainability benchmark model), feasibility of eWaste product takeback and brainstorming ideas to achieve our renewable energy target.

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Pictured above: The chart above reveals how Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand is tracking against targets, activities undertaken to reduce our footprint and what is still on the agenda.

”We always enjoy hosting the MGSM interns and get some business value from their time with us” said Lee Stewart, Head of Sustainability for Fujitsu Australia & New Zealand. “They bring a great blend of business experience and theoretical understanding, which they apply to create something of value to Fujitsu.  As a small team, having interns provides sustainability with not only assistance with some of our projects but also fresh perspectives and insights”.

At the 2017 Fujitsu World Tour we recently launched our Smart eWaste bin which uses IoT technology to assist customers to take the hassle out of ewaste.  For her project, Tinu will be working on a pricing model for our customers, enabling them to predict the costs of having a smart eWaste bin on their premises whilst still providing flexibility for Fujitsu. Drawing on more than a dozen years experience in the retail banking sector, Tinu will examine different approaches such as cost and value sharing, cost ceiling guarantees and provide a business case for adoption, as well as looking at external grants or funding rebates that customers could apply.

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Pictured above: Lee Stewart, Head of Sustainability for Fujitsu Australia and New Zealand explaining the benefits of the Smart eWaste bin at Fujitsu World Tour 2017.

“Working with Fujitsu has further enriched my MBA experience. I have been able to apply my financial background and quantitative methods of research gained in the course of my MBA to make meaningful contributions in developing a pricing model for the smart eWaste Bin. This project has in turn helped me identify sustainable business opportunities in the electronic waste industry,” says Tinu.

Tuta’s project will see the creation of an Indigenous Procurement Strategy for Fujitsu. As part of our commitment to Diversity & Inclusion the sustainability team is keen to explore how Fujitsu can provide Indigenous Australians with more opportunities to participate in the economy. Tuta has more than a decade’s experience in supply chain management in her home country of Kenya, including managing supply forecasting, procurement and management for an $80M business unit for Unilever East Africa. Included in Tuta’s project will be a survey of the competitive landscape for indigenous procurement and the specific opportunities to include indigenous suppliers in Fujitsu’s supply chain. This important project will create value for Fujitsu and the community while also helping Fujitsu to meet customer expectations, particularly in the Federal Government space.

“I feel privileged to be given a chance to work in a completely different industry and environment with the Fujitsu Sustainability team. This gives me the opportunity to not only contribute to a key component of the business by coming up with the indigenous procurement strategy, but also to gain key insights in the role business plays in creating a positive impact to society,” says Tuta.

Both Tuta and Tinu will be presenting the findings from their respective projects to key Fujitsu stakeholders before the end of their placement in August, after which they will return to Edinburgh to complete their MBA program. We wish them the best of luck as they continue their Fujitsu placement and their studies!

Fujitsu World Tour in Australia and New Zealand brings Co-creation to life

Australia and New Zealand are both a long way away from the rest of the world. Melbourne is about 8,000 km from Tokyo and around 16,000 km from Munich. Auckland is about 2,000 km further still. So when we get the opportunity in this region to experience the best thought leadership and technology from Fujitsu around the world we make the most of it.

First stop – Auckland New Zealand

And make the most of it we did. As Fujitsu World Tour 2017 touched down in Auckland on June 20th the results of many months of preparation started to pay off. Over two hundred people gathered at The Langham in Auckland to get a taste of what Fujitsu was all about. Even though the event has been running for many years, this year was the very first time that Fujitsu World Tour has been hosted in New Zealand.

From the time the doors opened early in the morning the Expo floor was a hive of activity, with a buzzing atmosphere and excitement rapidly increasing. ‘Digital Co-creation’ was the main theme of the event and this was clearly the focus of the expo. It was hard to miss the brightly decorated ‘Co-creation Station’, which was located right in the middle of the floor, manned by our Digital Co-creation specialists. The Lego blocks on display provided an excellent talking point for our consultants to describe Fujitsu’s various co-creation initiatives and techniques to foster digital innovation.

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Pictured: Co-creation station

Also on display for the first time were a number of innovative displays including Fujitsu’s ‘Smart Shoes Hub’, the Head-mounted Display, and a fascinating display of Spatiowl modelling traffic flow information. Fujitsu’s Palm Secure was also a big hit in New Zealand, with the expo showing different use cases of this great technology including a ‘Smart Gate’, time and attendance recording, locker opening and a host of other applications. It was not just the conference attendees who were impressed, a news crew from NZ TV3 seized the opportunity to capture a two minute article to be aired on prime time television.

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Pictured: Smart Shoes

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Clip from TV3 News

The activity was not just concentrated on the expo floor. Well-known New Zealand media personality Samantha Hayes provided the opening address and took the role of the Master of Ceremonies throughout the day. The agenda was packed with Fujitsu’s international thought leaders including Ramanan Ramakrishna and Yoshikuni Takashige who shared their insight to an engaged audience in the packed auditorium. After providing his insight into Human Centric Innovation, Takashige-san also provided a 15 minute video interview with Fairfax New Zealand on the subject of Human Centric Innovation.

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Pictured: Samantha Hayes – MC at Fujitsu World Tour Auckland

As well as Fujitsu’s international personalities, we were also proud to host one of our international customers. Steve Walker from DHL presented a riveting account of his company’s digital transformation journey. He talked about many initiatives DHL has put in place including technology to reduce driver fatigue as well as the use of augmented reality to assist with warehouse operations. A panel discussion consisting of Fujitsu local and international representatives and customers also provided different viewpoints on digital transformation.

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Steve Walker from DHL

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Ramanan Ramakrishna

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Next Stop Melbourne…

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After a busy day in Auckland, it was time to replicate it all again in Melbourne for a much bigger event and a larger audience. Over 500 people packed into the Crown Promenade for an even bigger expo and conference agenda than Auckland. This marked the second time that Fujitsu World Tour was hosted in Melbourne, the last time was two years ago in 2015. The event opened with an address by the Hon. Philip Dalidakis, MP – Minister for Small Business, Innovation and Trade, who spoke about a number of issues including the ethics around the application of artificial intelligence (AI). Media personality and well-known journalist Ellen Fanning kept the audience engaged as Master of Ceremonies.

The expo floor in Melbourne had a real buzz about it as people took time out from the conference agenda to bring themselves up to speed with all that Fujitsu can offer. Once again Palm Secure attracted a lot of attention – aided by the special ‘experiential’ displays that showcased how various technologies could be used in Education, Healthcare and Retail applications.

The digital media display also kept people talking, with an innovative face recognition system that would detect the age, gender and mood of the audience in front of the screen so that relevant content could be displayed. And once again the Fujitsu innovations area captivated the audience with the display of the ‘Smart Shoes Hub’ and the ‘Head-mounted display’. Once again the event attracted interest from a television news station, with a crew from Channel Nine News taking the time to capture the moment.

As with Auckland, Takashige-san delivered the final keynote and left the audience thinking about what the future of technology will look like. After two very busy days it was time for Fujitsu World Tour to leave the Oceania Region as it continues its journey across the world.

The Fujitsu World Tour countdown is on!

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After months of planning and preparation Fujitsu World Tour is headed down under! We are two weeks out from Fujitsu World Tour Auckland (Tuesday 20th June) and Melbourne (Thursday 22nd June)…the countdown is on!

We are excited to host the biggest event for Fujitsu Australia & New Zealand in Auckland this year – a first for New Zealand! We have had great interest in the event so far, with over 300 people already registered for Auckland and over 600 in Melbourne. And we are expecting more to come as we get closer to the event.

The overarching theme of the tour is Human Centric Innovation: Digital Co-creation, which is central to Fujitsu’s partnership approach with its customers, partners and suppliers. Through a series of expert talks, breakout sessions and technology showcases, the event will demonstrate new ways of using ICT – including the Internet of Things, Hybrid IT and other Digital Technologies – to benefit business and society as a whole.

Leading experts, such as The Hon Philip Dalidakis, Victorian MP for Small Business, Innovation and Trade will present in Melbourne, with keynote speakers Yoshikuni Takashige, Visionary Architect of Fujitsu, Ramanan Ramakrishna Head of Service Innovation & Portfolio Managed Infrastructure Services, and Steve Walker, APAC CIO of DHL presenting at both our Auckland and Melbourne events.

Below are a few of the fantastic innovations that will be on display at the event:

Spatiowl – Derived from the prefix “Spatio,” meaning “space,” combined with “Owl,” an ancient symbol of wisdom, Spatiowl is a powerful service for integrated management of transportation systems using Big Data analytics and Cloud Computing technology. The technology can collate date from sources such as public transportation, vehicles, and pedestrians’ smartphones in urban areas through sensors.

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Interactive Shoe Hub – Fujitsu’s ‘Smart Shoes’ enable anyone to collect, collate and analyse sensor data from the shoes they wear everyday. All sorts of information is collected by sensors embedded in the shoes, including movement of the feet, pressure and curvature.

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Ubiquitousware – this is an IoT Solution which includes the Head Mounted Display (used for HMD remote support) and Worker Safety (a vital sensing demo and Amplify interface will be displayed). Both technologies aim to sense the status of people, things and surrounding environments.

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At Fujitsu World Tour, we are giving participants an interactive experience to help drive digital transformation. The co-creation station will provide an example of how Fujitsu works with customers to help solve current and future business challenges. Come and shape the future of technology and become a #cocreationist. Our experiential zone will also feature innovations and solutions for use within our key verticals.

It’s not too late to register – we welcome you to attend this fantastic event! And if you do, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter here for live updates from the tour and use the hashtag #FujitsuWorldTour to join the conversation and see your post appear on our Live Twitter Wall at the event!

The digital transformation journey – RunMyProcess

Fujitsu’s RunMyProcess is a unique cloud platform that enables fast and secure delivery of connected applications, extending enterprise systems and processes to the people, clouds and devices of the digital world. Essentially it can be used by anyone with a business process!

RunMyProcess results in better business processes, faster operations and cost efficiencies for our clients.

The people behind RunMyProcess are digital problem solvers who utilize technology to achieve three key outcomes for business: Connecting the digital enterprise, solving digital problems and enabling end-to-end digital change.

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Our innovative infographic helps to break down the ‘who, how, what and why’ of all things RunMyProcess.

WHO?

More than 500 businesses in over 40 countries have joined Fujitsu on their RunMyProcess journey including: Fujitsu’s Global Service Desk, Adidas, DHL, Nestle, iHeartStudios & HomeServe USA.

You can view the iHeartStudios and HomeServe USA case studies on YouTube.

HOW?

Build. Deploy. Run. And then we’re done.

Build – Rapidly deliver device independent, connected applications that automate end-to-end digital processes.

Deploy – Instantly and cost-effectively deploy systems from one user up to global audiences without change.

Run – Experience secure, reliable and scalable operations that ensure systems are globally available 24/7.

RunMyProcess can solve a wide range of business problems. Some of these are outlined below with their respected case studies:

Cloud Cost Management – Fujitsu Enabling Software Technology (subsidiary of Fujitsu IT group)

SAP Integration – Fater (leading personal care company in the Italian market)

Enterprise Mobility – RATP Group (French state-owned public transport operator)

API Management – Fujitsu global service desk

Salesforce IntegrationiHeart Studios (London based digital content studio)

 IBM Notes application replacement. – Welch Allyn (medical equipment manufacturer)

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WHAT?

RMP is a cloud platform enabling end to end digital transformation through:

  • Unifying the digital experience
  • Connecting the digital supply chain
  • Delivering at digital speed and scale
  • Empowering digital innovation

RMP’s one-click deployment can result in iterative business change, enabling digital transformation to be achieved at rapid scale.

WHY?

To create a new digital working style, empowering people to work anywhere, anytime!

We are hearing the buzz words ‘digital transformation’ loud and clear, and know it is much more than technology. To find out more about how Fujitsu has helped a range of businesses to evolve quickly and successfully into a digital enterprise, download our White Paper and other collateral.

In December 2016, Fujitsu teams participated in a Hackathon activity where they developed innovative business ideas utilizing RunMyProcess technology. Some of these ideas are on their way to becoming commercial success! Read more about the Hackathon and the way in which RunMyProcess was used, here.

Hear from the Fujitsu Graduate Alumni – Katrina Ramsey

Fujitsu Australia & New Zealand is a big supporter of Graduate Employment, with our Graduate Program receiving support from our CEO executive team. Initiated in 2010, Fujitsu is proud to be developing the next generation of Australia and New Zealand’s talented young professionals through our comprehensive and practical program.

In this Four-Part Blog series, hear from Katrina Ramsey, a member of the Fujitsu Graduate Alumni.

Why Fujitsu?

I chose Fujitsu because it is a well-known company with a strong global presence. At 21, having arrived from England, I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to do, but knew that due to its size Fujitsu had a variety of roles and I was confident that one of them would be the right fit for me. I have been lucky enough to have had excellent managers throughout my entire career at Fujitsu.

Was the program rewarding in terms of developing your career?

I started as a Sales Grad in the Platforms Group. I was buddied up with a very successful sales team and was immediately visiting customers and interacting with the wider Fujitsu group involved in the end to end sales cycle. I was then offered a secondment to work in the Service Delivery team for one of our larger customers. A few weeks in and I knew that I had found my perfect role. I loved getting to know the customer and their business and working out how Fujitsu could add value. I am currently Fujitsu’s Service Delivery Director for Australia Post and I love working with really great and varied teams on the Fujitsu side as well as the customer side. No day is ever the same!

Describe a Fujitsu graduate in 3 words.

Curious, Self-motivated, Authentic

What skills do you believe a Graduate needs to be successful in the program?

A successful grad will be someone who builds a good network early on. Self-motivation is key. As a Grad you need to take responsibility for your own development and learning. People will be much more receptive to helping you out if you take the initiative first. A graduate also needs to be able to collaborate well. Don’t be a lone wolf!

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Pictured: Katrina Ramsey has been working at Fujitsu since the end of 2009 and has grown from a Sales Graduate into a Service Delivery Manager responsible for a team of 40+ engineers and Junior Service Delivery Managers.

Hear from the Fujitsu Graduate Alumni – Hara Duckstein

Fujitsu Australia & New Zealand is a big supporter of Graduate Employment, with our Graduate Program receiving support from our CEO and executive team. Initiated in 2010, Fujitsu is proud to be developing the next generation of Australia and New Zealand’s talented young professionals through our comprehensive and practical program.

In this Four-Part Blog series, hear from Hara Duckstein, a member of the Fujitsu Graduate Alumni:

Was the Fujitsu graduate program rewarding in terms of developing your career?

In January 2013, I joined Fujitsu as part of the Service Delivery Graduate Program. I was exposed to key operational areas of the Managed Services business, both in Australia and abroad. I was placed into various business areas including the End User Services Group, Sales & Service Delivery and Project management which rounded my skills set and experience. Early on in the program, I was deployed onto a customer project and loved the direct engagement with our customers.

More recently I have worked as a Service Delivery Manager for one of our largest customer accounts. Day to Day, I led and engaged with a team of 70+ agents, engineers and managers in a matrix account across Australia, the Philippines and India.

What did you love most about the program?

The Mentoring and Buddy Programs were the best parts of the Graduate Program. I got to develop an extensive support network from Senior Leaders to previous Grad Alumni. Many of these individuals still provide guidance and support to me today. Engagement and exposure across our customer portfolio was also fantastic – as a Graduate I was quickly deployed into a customer facing role, which was an exciting opportunity to develop my Service Management skills.

What was the coolest experience you had within the Graduate Program?

The opportunity to network with the Senior Leadership Team at a dinner hosted by our CEO was a fantastic experience to build my internal network.

What was the biggest challenge you faced in the program?

Probably the biggest challenge was having limited IT technical knowledge. I studied a Bachelor of Business and had a background in Banking and Financial Services so I was nervous that I didn’t have a deep enough understanding about traditional IT systems and practices. IT acronyms are also another language which I’m still learning today!

Words of advice to potential graduates looking to apply…

Throw your hat in the ring! A lot of my success at Fujitsu has come down to having an open mind and putting my hand up for opportunities which were sometimes challenging and unfamiliar. It’s also incredibly important to bring a curious attitude and demonstrate enthusiasm for learning as a Graduate!

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Pictured above: Hara Duckstein has been with Fujitsu since 2013 and has since gained experience working across Service Delivery and Human Resources.